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Volume 19 Issue 1 - September 2013

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  • September
  • Jazz
  • October
  • Toronto
  • Theatre
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  • Orchestra
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  • Guelph

5) Over time it became

5) Over time it became clearArvo Pärt.that nobody wanted to listen tothe most difficult new musicexcept weird people and snobs.The composers grew up and hadchildren, but their kids weren’tweird snobs and they didn’t likeit either. Most of them got intohip-hop, actually.6) Eventually composers gottired of only being listened toby snobby weirdos, and startedwriting music again that nonmusicians— that is, mostnormal people — could like andappreciate.7) Now we have to convince everyone that new music isn’tas bizarre as the stuff their grandparents hated. A lot of it isn’t.Really! In fact it’s pretty tame. Composers want to be yourfriends. So will you please come back and listen?Now, you may go to a concert in which nice pleasant classicalmusic by dead guys is played, and then the stupid musicianswill throw in some new stuff as well. Sorry about that — wekind of like to mix it up. Please don’t leave. You will upset thecomposers’ mums, ’cause they are all still alive and their feelingsget hurt when you walk out or throw things at their sons anddaughters. But don’t worry — if you happen to get stuck at aconcert with totally discordant music, you have two sure-firemethods of recourse:1) Before the concert, watch (on YouTube) the episode of StarTrek: TNG in which Lieutenant Worf listens to Klingon opera(“Unification II,” season 5, 1991). Then pretend Klingon opera isthe music you’re going to hear. Be brave like Worf and listen to it.2) Think of scary movies. Actually, think of any movie inwhich bad things happen. Listen (on YouTube) to LeonardBernstein’s score for On the Waterfront (1954) and BernardHerrmann’s score for Psycho (1960). Not so bad, right? Next timeyou’re at a new music concert, close your eyes and imagine that you’rebeing menaced by a lunatic or getting beat up by dockyard thugs. Thiswill render the musical experience much more enjoyable.I hope this solves the problem and encourages you to take a chanceon the new stuff. If not, I’ll have no choice but to write about thissubject again, but seriously this time. Trust me, you don’t want that.Now, on to the concerts.Estonian composer Arvo Pärt is an example of a composer whosework has depth, edge and substance, but has also found popular,Alice Parker.mainstream appeal with many audiences— especially choral audiences,which can be quite a conservative bunch.Soundstreams Canada has long been acentral champion of Pärt’s music in Canada,and their house choir, Choir 21, boasts someof the strongest choral singers in the region.This is a chance to hear this music masterfullyexecuted.The concert on October 1 will includethe Canadian premieres of two Pärt works,Adam’s Lament and L’abbe Agathon, andthe world premieres of two Canadianworks, James Rolfe’s Open Road, and anew commission (written fora very special reason whichwill be revealed at the concert)by young Canadian-Estoniancomposer Riho Mamets. I donot know his work, but I amfamiliar with Rolfe, and I canassure wary concert-goers thatthis will certainly be a movingand delightful concert. If you arenew to modern choral works,this is an excellent chance toexperience composers andmusicians working at the topof their game. Guest conductorTõnu Kaljuste is one of theworld’s great choral musicians.Another notable choral visittakes place in October, but registrationfor the event is underway even as I write. Americanchoral composer, arranger,author and conductor Alice Parker is coming for SING!, a three-dayworkshop and community songfest from October 25 to 27. Parker is achoral legend (now well into her ninth decade) who has devoted herlife to choral music. During the weekend Parker will lead communitysinging, give a workshop on hymnody in worship, lecture at theUniversity of Toronto, preach at Yorkminster Park Baptist Churchand conduct a massed choir of over 200 singers in a grand finaleconcert. The gala finale will include a who’s who of Toronto choralgroups: the University of Toronto MacMillan Singers, U of T Women’sChamber Choir & Men’s Chorus, Exultate Chamber Singers, OrpheusPeeter LaNgovits28 | September 1 – October 7, 2013 thewholenote.com

AMADEUS CHOIR OF GREATER TORONTOLYDIA ADAMS, CONDUCTOR and ARTISTIC DIRECTOR2013 2014TORONTO CONCERT SERIES39 th SeasonCHORALLANDSCAPESCelebratingLydia Adams’ 30 th Anniversaryas Conductor and Artistic Director of the Amadeus ChoirTHE WRITER’S WAR:TRIBUTE TO WAR CORRESPONDENTSSat. Nov. 9, 2013 at 7:30 pm • All Saints Kingsway Anglican Church2850 Bloor St. West, TorontoMulti-media production featuring Rick MacInnes-Rae, Joan Leishman andLaura Lynch, all former reporters in war-torn areas of the world.Amadeus Choir of Greater TorontoLydia Adams, Conductor • Rebecca Whelan, soprano• Nelson Lohnes, bass • Shawn Grenke, organSING WITH THE ANGELS!Sat. Dec. 14, 2013 at 7:30 pm • Yorkminster Park Baptist Church1585 Yonge Street, TorontoA Special Tribute to the Ontario Arts Council’s 50th AnniversaryEvening includes the winning compositions from the27th Annual Seasonal Song-Writing Competition.Featuring: Amadeus Choir of Greater TorontoLydia Adams, Conductor • Bach Children’s Chorus, Linda Beaupré, conductorErica Goodman, harp • Eleanor Daley and Shawn Grenke, piano and organJ.S. BACH’S MASS in B MINORIn collaboration with the Elmer Iseler SingersSat. April 12, 2014 at 7:30 pm • Metropolitan United Church56 Queen Street East, TorontoFeaturing: Amadeus Choir of Greater Toronto and the Elmer Iseler SingersLydia Adams, conductor • Meredith Hall, soprano•*Catherine Wyn-Rogers, mezzo soprano • Colin Ainsworth, tenor• Nathaniel Watson, bass baritone • Orchestra*Ms. Rogers performs courtesy of Metropolitan Opera, New York.JOY SOUNDSSat. May 31, 2014 at 7:30 pm • Christ Church Deer Park570 Yonge Street, TorontoFeaturing: Amadeus Choir of Greater TorontoLydia Adams, conductor • Shawn Grenke, pianoFor Subscriptions and Single Ticket InformationPlease Call 416-446-0188www.amadeuschoir.comDrama,& InspIratIon…Experience it all during theToronto Mendelssohn Choir’s13/14 season with Noel Edison,Artistic Director.BriTTEN AT 100Nov 20, 2013 at Yorkminster Park Baptist ChurchEnjoy two rarely performed dramatic cantatasby Benjamin Britten: The Company of Heavenand St. Nicolas.FEsTivAl oF CArols with Ben HeppnerDec 11, 2013 at Yorkminster Park Baptist Churchstart the Christmas season with a concertof festive music and stories, featuring tenorBen Heppner. Choose viP tickets for premiumseating and a post-concert reception with Ben.MeSSiaH with the tSODec 18, 2013 at roy Thomson HallTMC and Tso perform Handel’s immortaloratorio under the direction of conductorChristopher Warren-Green.MaSS iN B MiNorMar 26, 2014 at Koerner Hall,TElUs Centre for Performance and learningBe emotionally uplifted and intellectuallychallenged by Bach’s musical imagination inthis monumental work.sACrED MUsiC For A sACrED sPACEGood Friday, Apr 18, 2014 at st. Paul’s BasilicaEnjoy magnificent music for chorus andorgan: Duruflé’s requiem and vierne’s MesseSolennelle.Subscriptions start at 3 forall five concerts or 0 for three.Programmes subject to changewww.tmchoir.org416-598-0422 x221SubScribe now toour 13/14 SeaSonLiSten tothe tMcthewholenote.com September 1 – October 7, 2013 | 29

Volume 26 (2020- )

Volume 26 Issue 1 - September 2020
Volume 26 Issue 2 - October 2020

Volumes 21-25 (2015-2020)

Volume 25 Issue 9 - July / August 2020
Volume 25 Issue 8 - May / June 2020
Volume 25 Issue 7 - April 2020
Volume 25 Issue 6 - March 2020
Volume 25 Issue 5 - February 2020
Volume 25 Issue 4 - December 2019 / January 2020
Volume 25 Issue 3 - November 2019
Volume 25 Issue 2 - October 2019
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Volume 22 Issue 9 - Summer 2017
Volume 22 Issue 8 - May 2017
Volume 22 Issue 7 - April 2017
Volume 22 Issue 6 - March 2017
Volume 22 Issue 5 - February 2017
Volume 22 Issue 4 - December 2016/January 2017
Volume 22 Issue 2 - October 2016
Volume 22 Issue 1 - September 2016
Volume 21 Issue 9 - Summer 2016
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Volume 21 Issue 6 - March 2016
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Volume 21 Issue 4 - December 2015/January 2016
Volume 21 Issue 3 - November 2015
Volume 21 Issue 2 - October 2015
Volume 21 Issue 1 - September 2015

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