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Volume 23 Issue 7 - April 2018

  • Text
  • April
  • Toronto
  • Jazz
  • Musical
  • Symphony
  • Arts
  • Performing
  • Choir
  • Theatre
  • Orchestra
In this issue: we talk with jazz pianist Thompson Egbo-Egbo about growing up in Toronto, building a musical career, and being adaptive to change; pianist Eve Egoyan prepares for her upcoming Luminato project and for the next stage in her long-term collaborative relationship with Spanish-German composer Maria de Alvear; jazz violinist Aline Homzy, halfway through preparing for a concert featuring standout women bandleaders, talks about social equity in the world of improvised music; and the local choral community celebrates the life and work of choral conductor Elmer Iseler, 20 years after his passing.

an Ontario government

an Ontario government agency The WholeNote VOLUME 23 NO 7 | APRIL 2018 Centre for Social Innovation 720 Bathurst St., Suite 503, Toronto ON M5S 2R4 PHONE 416-323-2232 | FAX 416-603-4791 Publisher/Editor in Chief | David Perlman publisher@thewholenote.com Chairman of the Board | Allan Pulker directors@thewholenote.com EDITORIAL Managing Editor | Paul Ennis editorial@thewholenote.com Recordings Editor | David Olds discoveries@thewholenote.com Digital Media Editor | Sara Constant editorial@thewholenote.com Listings Editor | John Sharpe listings@thewholenote.com jazz@thewholenote.com SALES, MARKETING & MEMBERSHIP Concert & Event Advertising / Membership | Karen Ages members@thewholenote.com Advertising Art /Production Support / Operations Jack Buell | adart@thewholenote.com Classified Ads | classad@thewholenote.com Website/Systems Support | Kevin King systems@thewholenote.com Circulation/Subscriptions | Chris Malcolm circulation@thewholenote.com SUBSCRIPTIONS per year + HST (9 issues)* *international subscriptions, additional postage applies THANKS TO THIS MONTH’S CONTRIBUTORS Beat Columnists Wendalyn Bartley, Brian Chang, Paul Ennis, Jack MacQuarrie, Jennifer Parr, Lydia Perović, Andrew Timar, Steve Wallace, Christopher Hoile, Matthew Whitfield Features Wendalyn Bartley, Brian Chang, Sara Constant, David Jaeger, David Perlman, Ken Waxman CD Reviewers Alex Baran, Stuart Broomer, Raul da Gama, Hans de Groot, Janos Gardonyi, Richard Haskell, Tiina Kiik, Roger Knox, Lesley Mitchell-Clarke, David Olds, Ted Parkinson, Ivana Popovic, Cathy Riches, Terry Robbins, Michael Schulman, Sharna Searle, Colin Story, Bruce Surtees, Andrew Timar, Robert Tomas, Ken Waxman. Proofreading Sara Constant, Paul Ennis, John Sharpe Listings Team Ruth Atwood, Tilly Kooyman, John Sharpe, Katie White Design Team Kevin King, Susan Sinclair Circulation Team Lori Sandra Aginian, Wende Bartley, Beth Bartley / Mark Clifford, Diane Boyer, Jack Buell, Sharon Clark, Paul Ennis, Robert Faulkner, Terry Gaeeni, Steven Godbout, Gero Hajek, James Harris, Micah Herzog, Jeff Hogben, Bob Jerome, Chris Malcolm, Sheila McCoy, Lorna Nevison, Garry Page, Tom Sepp, Dagmar Sullivan, Dave Taylor, Randy Weir un organisme du gouvernement de l’Ontario an Ontario government agency un organisme du gouvernement de l’Ontario BEAT BY BEAT 22 Classical & Beyond | PAUL ENNIS 26 World View | ANDREW TIMAR 28 Music Theatre | JENNIFER PARR 30 On Opera | CHRISTOPHER HOILE 32 Art of Song | LYDIA PEROVIĆ 34 Early Music | MATTHEW WHITFIELD 36 Choral Scene | BRIAN CHANG 40 Jazz Notes | STEVE WALLACE 42 Bandstand | JACK MACQUARRIE LISTINGS 44 A | Concerts in the GTA 58 B | Concerts Beyond the GTA 60 C | Music Theatre 61 D | In the Clubs (Mostly Jazz) 62 E | The ETCeteras 26 DISCOVERIES: RECORDINGS REVIEWED 66 Editor’s Corner | DAVID OLDS 68 Strings Attached | TERRY ROBBINS 70 Keyed In | ALEX BARAN 72 Vocal 73 Classical and Beyond 75 Modern and Contemporary 76 Jazz and Improvised Music 79 Pot Pourri 80 Something in the Air | KEN WAXMAN 82 Old Wine, New Bottles | BRUCE SURTEES MORE 6 Contact Information 7 Upcoming dates and deadlines 43 Index of Advertisers 64 Classified Ads UPCOMING SPECIAL SECTIONS In May 2018: The Canary Pages All things choral in Southern Ontario In June 2018: The Green Pages Summer Music Guide 6 | April 2018 thewholenote.com

FOR OPENERS | DAVID PERLMAN A Feather in the Glenn Gould Foundation Cap? or once, I had this Opener figured out days in advance, thanks to a snippet of news that came my way relating to Estonian F Music Week, which kicks off May 24 and will offer concerts and workshops in a bunch of different musical genres and eight different Toronto venues, from Lee’s Palace to Koerner Hall, all timed to coincide with the 100th anniversary of Estonia’s independence. But that’s May’s news. The detail that caught my eye right now, and much more in keeping with this month’s topic, was an initiative to the tune of around two million Canadian dollars, titled “An Instrument for Every Child,” designed to put a musical instrument in the hands of every Estonian child who wants to play one, with no limitations in terms of musical styles. But just a couple of hours before going to press with this issue of TheWholeNote, word came through to us from the Glenn Gould Foundation, of the death of Venezuelan visionary educator, Dr. José Antonio Abreu, founder of El Sistema, a transformative program of intensive free music education and orchestral training, starting in early childhood. “Abreu was a visionary figure, who recognized the power of music to transform the lives of children suffering the ravages of poverty and the host of social ills that goes with it” reads the statement posted on the Glenn Gould Foundation website. “From that realization, and by sheer force of will, he built the movement that came to be known as El Sistema, beginning with a mere 11 young people in 1975, but ultimately [spreading] to more than 25 countries worldwide, adapting and accommodating itself to the social and economic context of each.” I’d already been planning, cleverly, to link this new Estonian initiative to the topic of Abreu, El Sistema and the GGF because April is, as it happens, announcement time for the Glenn Gould Prize for the arts. This year’s distinguished jury is heading to town shortly (unless of course they already live here) and, on April 13 at 12:30pm in the galleria at Koerner Hall the jury will announce this year’s prize winner, following which, as surely as pigeons have wings, feathers will ruffle and/or fly in all directions. After dust and dander settle, the public, and the jury, can take in an astounding 8pm Koerner concert by a likely future winner of this and/or many other prizes, 13-year old British composer, pianist, violinist and improviser Alma Deutscher. A bit of history: The Glenn Gould Prize started out in 1987 as a strictly musical one, awarded every three years; R. Murray Schafer was its first recipient; then Yehudi Menuhin in 1990, Oscar Peterson in 1993, and Toru Takemitsu, Yo-Yo Ma, Pierre Boulez and André Previn, in 1996, 1999, 2002 and 2005 respectively. Abreu was the 2008 honoree, followed by Leonard Cohen in 2011, Robert Lepage in 2013 and Philip Glass in 2015. Somewhere along the way, I think either just before or just after the award to Leonard Cohen, it was announced that henceforth the prize would be known as the Glenn Gould Prize for the arts, rather than strictly for music. And around the same time as the change to “Prize for the Arts” was announced, it was also announced that the Prize would be awarded every two years instead of every three. One more little piece of history: since 1993, the year Oscar Peterson won, there has been a second award, called the City of Toronto Protégé Prize, awarded to some person, or in one case organization, of the Laureate’s own choosing, generally announced at the prize-giving ceremony sometime during the year after the announcement of the main award. Abreu selected Gustavo Dudamel as protégé in his year. Yo-Yo Ma selected a true protégé, future fellow Silk Road Project core company member, pipa player Wu Man for his. She remains to this point the only woman among the 20 honorees to date. Growing up: Of all the laureates so far, Abreu was for me the one that best reflected what prizes like this should really be for, and the direction that I hope this year’s jury will take in their deliberations. I understand why for the first couple of decades of its existence a prize like this is as much intent on building its own pedigree via the credentials of its chosen laureates as the other way round. The Prize had to prove its importance by choosing widely know laureates, who then, usually, return the favour by the graciousness and alacrity with which they acknowledge the importance of the award. But how much better when the Prize is bestowed on someone of towering importance to art and life whom we don’t already know. Abreu was one such person for me; I will always be grateful that the Prize brought his life-changing work to my attention. Going further, it is highly unlikely that El Sistema would have found fertile soil in Toronto and elsewhere in Canada were it not for the prominence given the movement here in 2008. The April 13 announcement will take the Prize to a whole new level if it brings into the limelight a person (of any gender) who stands to benefit more from having their work brought into focus by the Prize, than the Prize merely basking in the laureate’s reflected glory. Now that would truly be a feather in the Glenn Gould Foundation cap. As for the matter of the gender of the laureates, it’s an issue that gets thornier with every passing cycle. Each time a man is chosen, the cumulative imbalance becomes more improbable. Just as problematic, though, in my view, will be the backlash as and when this changes – the huffing and puffing of small-hearted people who will immediately assume that this award, unlike the other 19, was gender-based. So, to the jury, good luck. To those who are waiting to question the jury’s integrity, look into your own hearts. To José Antonio Abreu, you will not be forgotten. publisher@thewholenote.com Upcoming Dates & Deadlines Free Event Listings Deadline Midnight, Sunday April 8 Display Ad Reservations Deadline 6pm Sunday April 15 Advertising Materials Due 6pm Tuesday April 17 Classifieds Deadline 10pm Saturday April 21 Publication Date Wednesday April 25 (online) Friday April 27 (print edition) Volume 23 No 8 “MAY” covers May 1 - June 7, 2018 WholeNote Media Inc. accepts no responsibility or liability for claims made for any product or service reported on or advertised in this issue. Printed in Canada Couto Printing & Publishing Services COPYRIGHT © 2018 WHOLENOTE MEDIA INC Circulation Statement March 2018 30,000 printed & distributed Canadian Publication Product Sales Agreement 1263846 ISSN 14888-8785 WHOLENOTE Publications Mail Agreement #40026682 Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to: WholeNote Media Inc. Centre for Social Innovation 503–720 Bathurst Street Toronto ON M5S 2R4 thewholenote.com NOTICE OF CORRECTION: In the third-to-last paragraph of last issue’s On Opera column, it was stated that mezzo Marion Newman, who sings the title role in the Voicebox: Opera in Concert production The Ecstasy of Rita Joe, also served as an advisor on the project. While she met informally with the composer twice during the development of the project, the nature of the input offered and the extent to which it was accepted were not sufficient to warrant describing the role as advisory. Permission was neither sought by the composer nor given by Ms. Newman to characterize her role as that of advisor. thewholenote.com April 2018 | 7

Volume 26 (2020- )

Volume 26 Issue 1 - September 2020

Volumes 21-25 (2015-2020)

Volume 25 Issue 9 - July / August 2020
Volume 25 Issue 8 - May / June 2020
Volume 25 Issue 7 - April 2020
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Volume 25 Issue 4 - December 2019 / January 2020
Volume 25 Issue 3 - November 2019
Volume 25 Issue 2 - October 2019
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Volume 24 Issue 4 - December 2018 / January 2019
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Volume 24 Issue 1 - September 2018
Volume 23 Issue 9 - June / July / August 2018
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Volume 23 Issue 7 - April 2018
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Volume 22 Issue 9 - Summer 2017
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