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4 years ago

Volume 3 Issue 1 - September 1997

  • Text
  • Toronto
  • September
  • Choir
  • Concerts
  • Wholenote
  • Orchestra
  • Classical
  • Comprehensive
  • Contemporary
  • Musical

4 september '97

4 september '97 wholenote Stand clear, trebles four, she's gone The art of change ringing has arrived in Toronto BY PETER IVERSON Every Sunday morning from the belfry of St. James Cathedral, twelve English style change ringing bells peal forth over the market area from 10:30.AM until 11 o'clock heralding the 11 o'clock service. What exactly is change ringing? Because you can't ring "tunes" on swinging bells, a complex systen of patterns has developed with a number of rules since 16th century England. The bells begin ringing down the scale - this is called rounds. Here is a pattern for simple ringing called Plain Hunt Minor. Note that it is all numerical; notes are not used: 123456 · rounds 214365 ·change ringing 241635 426153 and so on. Most churches in Canada have toll bells which swing back and forth. English change ringing bells reach full circle, 360 degrees, until they reach a wooden stay Continued on page 21 'Oncert 'fnt ' ••v es -- - ~~TOitOtiTO ~ SCHOOL OF MOSIC Beneficial September as usual takes a couple of weeks to hit stride, but even so, there's no shortage of good music. Four of these September concerts are worthy benefits. September 13 four outstanding singers, Monica Whicher, Elizabeth Turnbull, Michael Schade and Russell Braun perform at the Ford Centre to benefit L'Arche Daybreak, home for people with Summer is over and the annual nine and a half month Toronto music glutfest (roughly 2400 concerts between now and the end of June) is poised to begin. developmental disabilities. September 20 Alexander Kats and others perform at the Church of St. George the Martyr to raise funds to assist Theodore Gentry, the Canadian countertenor whose international career was interrupted in the fall of 1996 by a stroke. Then, September 24 leading Canadian jazz musicians, including Rob McConnell, Moe Koffman, Jim Galloway, Phil Nimmons, Guido Basso, Peter Appleyard and pscar Peterson play Continued page 17 Maureen Forrester, Honorary Chair Colin Yip, President Distinguished teaching faculty includes: Maureen Forrester, Kenneth Merrill, Dixie Ross Neill, William Neill, Jean MacPhail, Gabor Carelli, Atis Bankas, Hao-Jiang Tien, Eugene Kash, Hong-yu Chen, David Warrack, Andras Weber, Reginald Miller, Vera Kaushansky, Sheng-Mao Hong, Gordon Brown, Sabatino Vacca, Bo-Zhi Alec Hou •INTERNATIONAL OPERA CENTRE One year professional opera training program, September 1997 - May 1998 •PROFESSIONAL PERFORMANCE DIPLOMA For high school graduates who wish to become professional musicians. PIANO ·VOICE· STRINGS· WOODWINDS- COMPOSITION- JAZZ- CHINESE MUSIC- CHURCH MUSIC· OPERA- MUSICAL THEATRE •PROFESSIONAL ADVANCED CERTIFICATE PROGRAM Advanced level studies for the professional student. PIANO ·STRINGS· VOICE· WOODWINDS •GENERAL MUSIC EDUCATION This music program provides private or group instruction for children (ages 4 and up) as well as adults. Classes are offered at beginner and advanced levels. Opera and concert opportunities throughout for performance-ready students For information and registration, contact the School at: 366 Bay Street (Near Richmond St.), Toronto, Ontario, M5H 4B2, Phone: 416-366-6699, Fax: 416-366-6688 · 109 - 80 Acadia Avenue, Markham, Ontario, L3R 9V1, Phone: 905-513-1685, Fax: 905-513-6140 TO~ONTO S ONLY COMPREHENSIVE MONTHLY C:.ASSICf\L & CONTEMPORARY CONCERT LISTING SOURCE

wholenote september '97 5 More ... Much More than just a Music Store ... Toronto's Source For Printed Music, Gifts & Musical Accessories TORONTO'S STEINWAY GALLERY Fine Pianos By: STEINWAY & SONS 00t1Jit111(by Steinway) IBACH ~n~ler &

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