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Volume 3 Issue 1 - September 1997

  • Text
  • Toronto
  • September
  • Choir
  • Concerts
  • Wholenote
  • Orchestra
  • Classical
  • Comprehensive
  • Contemporary
  • Musical

september '97 wholenote

september '97 wholenote SEPTEMBER Friday, September 5 NEXT GENERATION: LAURA WILCOX Sunday, September 7 DIAPHONY Tuesday, September 16, 9 pm CCMC Friday, September 19 NEXT GENERATION: EVE EGOVAN Saturday, September 20 MUSIC .OF MADNESS Tuesday, September 23 KOHEI NISHIKAWA ENSEMBLE Thursday, September 25, 7 pm PERFORMANCE ASIATIQUE The Body Electric: •Friday, September 26 PACIFIC RIM •Saturday, September 27 NOISES OFF •Tuesday, September 30 LES TROIS GUITARISTES DE I.'APOC~VPSE •Wednesday, October 1 WEsTERN UNION The Canada Council Touri~g Office Conseil des Arts du Canada Office des tournees THE BODY ELECTRIC I GUITAREVOLUTION Waking up to the electric guitar From September 25 to October 5, Toronto will be the focus of The Body Electric I Guitarevolution -- a festival dedicated to new music for or by electric guitarists, with 10 concerts, a special exhibition at the Art Gallery of Ontario, a media conference and a variety of student workshops. Many of Toronto's leading new music presenters will take part in this celebration of all things 6-stringed, including The Esprit Orc;hestra, New Music Concerts, Hemispheres, The Music Gallery, the AGO and Harbourfront. The concerts feature performers and composers from Canada, the US and Europe. Highlights include ~ concert by Norway's Terje Rypdal in collaboration with Hemispheres, premiering works by Rypdal, Robert Stevenson and John Gzowski; the Fred Frith Guitar Quartet (with the unstoppable Fred Frith, Rene Lussier, Nic Didkovsky and Mark · Stewart); and an evening of electroacoustics and electro-loops with David Torn and Tim Brady. "The electric guitar epitomises many of the fundamental issues of PHOTO: CLEMENT TOPPING Tim Brady creative music at the end of the 20th century" writes Tim Brady, artistic director of the event. "Half acoustic, half electric, coming from an ancient tradition of plucked string instruments yet newly invented in the 1920's, over the past 40 years it has become the common denominator of musical life in the Western world, much as the piano was in the 19th century. It has become as much a cultural icon as a musical instrument. Yet it has curiously been ignored by,contemporary composers in spite of its tremendous potential and the rapid acceptance of other elecroacoustic instruments as a n expressive medium." Is this because it has become so strongly identified as an icon of popular music that composers have been deaf to it­ - accepting the popular vision of the instrument merely as a symbol of youthful rebellion? "Never a good thing to do" says Brady. "I mean, what an instrument it is! An unparallelled dynamic range (Joe Pass to Go Thrash); an enormous range of tone colour (squeaky clean to downright mean). It offers an staggering array of expressive means to a creative musician." In the past 20 years a younger generation of composers and performers, raised on rock 'n roll but open to contemporary and experimental music, has begun to explore this potential, with fantastic results. The Body Electric I Guitarevolution is the first ever festival devoted exclusively their music. It offers a new vision of the electric guitar and a new a pproach to contemporary music (The festival will also present concerts in Montreal, Vancouver, Wi;mipeg, Victoria, Jonquiere and New Yorll -- . 22 concerts in 12 days. Festival brochures will be available at The Music Gallery and at Steve's Music from September 1st. Ticket prices range from to .50, with student discounts, and will be available from The Music Gallery and at Harbourfront starting Sept 1st.) COMPREHENSIVE MONTHLY CLASSICAL & CONTEMPORARY CONCERT LISTING SOURCE

Discover the joy of singing at proVOCE Studios VVORKSHOPS,ETCETERA September 1 1:30. Toronto Early Music Players Association workshop with David Klausner. 932-8167. October 4, 9:00a.m. Toronto Early Music Players Association workshop with Avery Maclean. 932-8167. September 28, 2:00: CAMMAC Reading of Choruses from Gilbert and Sullivan and other stage music. 421-0779 September '19 & 20: Mississauga Symphony Used Book sale. Donations welcome: 905-712-4442. September 30, October 3 & 5: Toronto Symphony Fine Wine Auction and Festival. 593-7769, ext. 359. . CHOIRS INVITING NEW MEMBERS Annex Singers, 964-0726. Toronto Classical Singers, 416 443-0312. Song Cycles Choir on Bikes, 416 603-0735. Mississauga Festival Choir, 905-27 4-6590. Saint Andrew Chorale, 416 960-8737. North York Singers, 905-859-1944. Bach Children's Chorus, 416 431-0790 Sacred Music Society, 416 588-9079 Cantilena, 1-800-867-3281 Senior Choir pf St. Leonard's, 905-841 -6482 Millenium Singers, 41 6 364-5420 See AUDITIONS, CLASSES ETCETERA, page 18 SCHOLARSHIP AVAILABLE A scholarship for advanced study is available to serious students of th~ piano with Toronto teacher, Lawrence Pitchko. · Forty private lessons commencing October and opportunities to perform both solo and chamber repertoire in regular master classes and public concert are offered. Provision may be made for the purchase of scores. Master teacher, Lawrence Pitchko has toured as soloist, guest artist with orchestras, and chamber musician in England, Europe and the United States, and has been heard in Canada in concert and on CJRT and CBC radio networks. Tuition will be given in historical perspectives and styles, piano technique (human physicality and the mechanics of the piano}, rhythm, the construction of serious music and perjonnance techniques. . The student will be introduced to a supportive and enthusiastic atmosphere, erudite yet free of competition . . Interested applicants should send a resume and audiocassette of at least twenty, minutes ' duration f eaturing contrasting repertoire before September 22nd, 1997. A further "live" audition will be reqtlired. Please contact J. Blackstone 740 Eglinton Avenue West, Apt. 305, Toronto ON MSN 1 C4 NEW YORK • LOS ANGELES • WASHINGTON DC • TORONTO Dr Michael Warren, founder proVOCE Studios was founded in August 1996 by Dr. Michael Warren, a renowned vocal teacher based in New York City, and six of his most accomplished students and teaching colleagues. proVOCE has several objectives: • to introduce Dr. Warren's concepts of vocal technique and vocal health to singers throughout North America; • to provide additional training in performance and audition techniques, stage presence, languages, diction and acting; • to create performance opportunities for proVOCE students We offer classes for singers from beginners to advanced: • sing and play classes for children (2-12) • learn to sing for adults • sight singing • opera appreciation • diction classes (Italian, French, German, and Slavic languages) •opera workshops • weekend workshops in jazz, Broadway, and others, with guest faculty from New York, Toronto and Los Angeles • private lessons and vocal coaching Tuesday September 2: Registration begins Sunday September 14: Open House 2-5 pm at 732 Spadina Avenue Friday September 26, 7:00pm: Masterclass with Michael Warren Church of the Redeemer (A venue Road & Bloor) Sunday September 28, 2:00pm: Gala Concert featuring faculty and students Church of the Redeemer (A venue Road & Bloor) For more information call 960-0472 or 921-7646. We look forward to meeting you! NANCY DE LONG • KATHERINE SCOTT • TINA TORLONE proVOCE Studios 732 Spadina Avenue, Toronto M5S 2J2 (just south of Bloor W.) TEL 416 960-04 72 FAX 416- 921-8313 TORONTO'S ONLY COMPREHENSIVE MONTHLY CLASSICAL & CONTEMPORARY CONCERT LIS1lNG SOURCE

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