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Volume 9 Issue 8 - May 2004

  • Text
  • Choir
  • Toronto
  • Choral
  • Singers
  • Theatre
  • Jazz
  • Concerts
  • Musical
  • Chorus
  • Choirs

JAZZ NOTES continued

JAZZ NOTES continued from page 23 One of the aims is to give audiences the experience of hearing artists who are lesser known to the general public but no less creative for that. In some respects the soul of the Festival is found in some of the less heralded performances that take place every year. Here are a few of the artists who are not exactly household names but who really deliver the goods.Traditional fans should be sure to·check out pianist Butch Thompson who will be at Trader's Lounge in the Sheraton Centre Hotel for a couple of nights plus the Saturday afternoon Jazz Party. At the other end of the spectrum look for one of the most extrovert musicians in jazz, saxophonist Carlo Actis Dato from Italy in a free concert at Nathan Phillips Square. At the Montreal Bistro there will be a rare appearance of George Cables for a couple of nights. in tandem with Joanne Brackeen during a week of twin piano presentations. Then there is Carol Sloane at The Top O' The Senator for· three nights - one of Carol Sloane comes to The Top 0 'The Senator . for three nights my favourite singers - a real jazz vocalist. The evening concerts at Nathan Phillips Square will be double bills this year and I'm happy to say that there will be a Canadian presence on stage for seven of the ten nights. Another new component this year is the inclusion of a youth stage and for six of the ten days there will be student and faculty groups representing Humber College, York University and University Of Toronto. The pieces are in place, but as artistic director, putting the Festi- Featuring some of Toronto's best jazz musicians with a brief reflection by Jazz Vespers Clergy Sunday, May 2 - 4:30 NANCY WALKER, piano; KIERAN OVERS, bass BRIAN BARLOW, drums Sunday, May 16 - 4:30 PERRY WHITE QUARTET PERRY WHITE, saxophone Christ Church Deer Park, 1570 Yonge Street (north of St. Clair at Heath St.) 416-920-5211 Admission is free. An offering 1s received to support the work of the church, including Jazz Vespers. Dave Snider Music Centre 3225 Yonge St .. PH (416) 483-5825 eMai I: snidermusic@snidermusic.com www.snidermusic.com val together is one huge jigsaw decisions . Saying "no" is tough puzzle and a constant struggle to and selecting artists from the hun- . try and put a gallon of talent into a dreds who are worthy of inclusion pint pot. There are so many musi- is as thankless as it can be rewardcians I would like to include, but ing. But then, nobody said it would can't. The decisions are not easy be easy. Happy listening. In the Listings ... pages 72, 73 May is full of amazing music. Perhaps most notably, this year's Distillery Jazz Festival, May 20-30, features 250 performers at seven different venues in Toronto's Distillery Historic District. Tickets can be purchased in advance through Ticketking for or at the gate for . For more detailed information, visit their website at www.distilleryjazz.com, where a final schedule will be posted as soon as it is available. Many of the artists performing can also be seen throughout the city all this month. Luis Mario Ochoa's Y Cimarron (Lula Lounge, May 15), The Artie Roth Quintet (The Rex, May 21), Ron Davis (every Sunday, Gate 403), Bernie Senensky (Top O'The Senator, May 13-16) and Richard Whiteman (Rhodes Restaurant, May 28) to name a very few. And while Toronto is always full of opportunities to hear the talents of young jazz musicians - espe- Hot off an April 26 cd launch at the Senator, Jaymz Bee's Royal Jelly Orchestra dishes out seriously happy jazz at the Distillery cially at the post-secondary levelthis month offers an opportunity to hear some even younger musicians. Students from Humber College's Community Music School's Jazz program take the stage at the Rex from 11-5, May 2nd. Sophia Perlnum • Long & McQuade MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS• w w w. Ion g - m c quad e. com is pleased to present an intimate clinic with jazz legend Buddy Defranco One of Toronto's Oldest Music Stores ... With The Best Selection of Pop, Jazz & Broadway Sheet Music in the city - For Beginners and Professio11als - Come in and browse over 25,000 sheet music publications. We have a wide array of Woodwind, Brass, Keyboards, Guitars and Accessories. Music Lessons offered on site. Date: Time: Place: Fee: Thursday, May 13, 2004 7-9pm Long & McQuade 933 Bloor St.W., Toronto FREE Contact the Long & McQuade Bloor store's band department at 416-588-7886 for details. MAY 1 - juNE 7 2004

0 BAND STAND byMerlin Willicmzs ne of the recurring prob- you - Is there a bassoonist there? lem:' bands have is that of Yes? Then don't play her cues. findmg people to play some Cover up the delicate sound of a of the less common instruments. bassoon, and the player will won­ Player~ of double reeds, low der why they bother showing up woodwmds, horns and percussion at all. are frequently missing from moderate or even large concert bands. Part of the problem is the relative scarcity of players, but the sheer expense of obtaining the instruments themselves can be a hindrance. In addition, there are often more enticing playing opportunities for some of these musicians in orchestras. Add to that the frustration that occurs when one single oboe or bassoon is buried by an irisensitive group, and it's really not surprising that there's a shortage of some of the more interesting tone colours in band groups. I have a few suggestions: 1. Advertise - Make sure people know you're actually I.:,OOKING! When I prepare the band listings for the September WholeNote, I always ask if there are specific instruments that a band is looking for. I'd be happy to do it on a monthly basis too; if your band has an opening, let me know. 2. Subsidize - Consider purchasing expensive equipment to attract players. This is especially helpful with percussion gear. Many bands will also purchase baritone saxes, bass clarinets and tubas. It would be an excellent idea as well for a well-stocked band to consider purchasing an English horn as well, for the occasions when that. tone colour is desired. 3. Empathize - Have your band work on dynamic contrasts so that you can actually hear the bassoons and oboes. It's a good idea too to stop playing solo cues on other instruments. Take a look around Brass - Woodwind - String Instruments - Guitar Buy direct from the Distributor AUTHORIZED DEALER FOR: Armstrong, Artley, Besson, Benge Boosey & Hawkes. Buffet, Conn Getzen. Jupiter, Keilworth. King Ibanez Guitars, Scher! & Ruth String Inst. www.harknettmusic.com I'm sure others have strategies they've tried in order to find players of less common instruments. I'd love to hear what has worked or not worked for you. Now to the live music: The Brampton Concert Band has two performances scheduled this month, both with free admission. The first is on Saturday May 8, 7:00 p.m. at the Brampton City Hall Atrium. The event is a gala to celebrate the band's upcoming trip to Schladming, Austria. The second performance is at the John Street Roundhouse as part of Doors Open Toronto, on Saturday May 29 (time TBA). The Salvation Army Canadian Staff Band is celebrating its 35th anniversary with guest soloists Jens Lindemann, trumpet; Curtis Metcalf, euphonium; and alumni soloist of the CSB. The concert takes place May 1, 7:30 p.m. at Bayview Glen Church. Brass 'N Voices features the Metropolitan Silver Band and Singing OUT! at Metropolitan United Church on May 2, 2:00 p.m. Proceeds from this event go to ACT - Sherbourne Health Centre. Also on May 2, but at 3 p.m., the Markham Concert Band presents "Spring is Here at Last" featuring music by Brahms, Copland and Patterson, with ·guests, the True North Brass. The Hannaford Street Silver Band is presenting "Virtuoso Brass" with guest cornetist Roger .J~~HARKNETT Musical Services Ltd. MUSIC BOOKS BEST SELECTION OF POPULAR & EDUCATIONAL MUSIC Piano - Guitar - Instrumental Mid-Town Store 416-423-9494 943 Eglinton Ave. E. (W. ofL~slie) (Next door to Robert Lowrey's Piano Experts) Main Store 905-477-1141 2650 John Street (Just North of Steeles) Webster on May 30, 3 :00 p.m at the Jane Mallett Th'eatre. There is a pre-concert chat at 2: 15 with the soloist and conductor Nicholas Childs. There are many other worthy concerts on this month. I urge you to consult the listings section for complete details on these and many other events. Saxophonist & woodwind doubler Merlin Williams is a private woodwind teacher, freelflnce musician and an Artist/Clinician for Jupiter Music Cmuzda. If you would like an upcoming band event to be featured in the Bandstand column, feel free to contact Merlin at (416) 489-0275; by e-mail, merlinw@allstream.ne~· on the web, http://allstream.net/ -merlinw/. 0 YAMAHA MUSIC SCHOOL Celebrating 50 years of Yamaha music education in over 40 countries! Courses for specific ages, starting from 2! Piano Keyboard Guitar Violin Flute Sax Clarinet Theory 416· 224·5590 5075 Yonge St. www.yamaha.ca Save .. Present this ad for off the registration tee when you reqister for music lessons by May 31. 2004. SIO off discount is only valid for new students who reqister for lessons starting in September 2004 at 5075 Yonge St. Not valid tor Tunes For Twos or Seniors Keyboard Club. One discount per reqistration.

Volume 26 (2020- )

Volume 26 Issue 1 - September 2020
Volume 26 Issue 2 - October 2020

Volumes 21-25 (2015-2020)

Volume 25 Issue 9 - July / August 2020
Volume 25 Issue 8 - May / June 2020
Volume 25 Issue 7 - April 2020
Volume 25 Issue 6 - March 2020
Volume 25 Issue 5 - February 2020
Volume 25 Issue 4 - December 2019 / January 2020
Volume 25 Issue 3 - November 2019
Volume 25 Issue 2 - October 2019
Volume 25 Issue 1 - September 2019
Volume 24 Issue 8 - May 2019
Volume 24 Issue 7 - April 2019
Volume 24 Issue 6 - March 2019
Volume 24 Issue 5 - February 2019
Volume 24 Issue 4 - December 2018 / January 2019
Volume 24 Issue 3 - November 2018
Volume 24 Issue 2 - October 2018
Volume 24 Issue 1 - September 2018
Volume 23 Issue 9 - June / July / August 2018
Volume 23 Issue 8 - May 2018
Volume 23 Issue 7 - April 2018
Volume 23 Issue 6 - March 2018
Volume 23 Issue 4 - December 2017 / January 2018
Volume 23 Issue 3 - November 2017
Volume 23 Issue 2 - October 2017
Volume 23 Issue 1 - September 2017
Volume 22 Issue 9 - Summer 2017
Volume 22 Issue 8 - May 2017
Volume 22 Issue 7 - April 2017
Volume 22 Issue 6 - March 2017
Volume 22 Issue 5 - February 2017
Volume 22 Issue 4 - December 2016/January 2017
Volume 22 Issue 2 - October 2016
Volume 22 Issue 1 - September 2016
Volume 21 Issue 9 - Summer 2016
Volume 21 Issue 8 - May 2016
Volume 21 Issue 6 - March 2016
Volume 21 Issue 5 - February 2016
Volume 21 Issue 4 - December 2015/January 2016
Volume 21 Issue 3 - November 2015
Volume 21 Issue 2 - October 2015
Volume 21 Issue 1 - September 2015

Volumes 16-20 (2010-2015)

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Volumes 6 - 10 (2000 - 2006)

Volumes 1-5 (1994-2000)