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Volume 12 - Issue 1 - September 2006

  • Text
  • Jazz
  • Toronto
  • Theatre
  • Musical
  • September
  • October
  • Choir
  • Festival
  • Orchestra
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EARLY Musicby Frank

EARLY Musicby Frank NakashimaEssential Music: An Invitational Early Music PrimerDid you spend the summer tryingto stay cool listening to expensive,mega-wide, 3-D, ear-popping, digitalsurround musical extravaganzas,either at home or in your car?Perhaps you'd like to come downto earth and get back to the essenceof where our music comesfrom. Perhaps you would like tolearn more about Early Music.Consider attending the TorontoEarly Music Centre's annual EarlyMusic Fair on September 23rd:an early music "open house" at thehistorical Montgomery's Inn (restoredas a living museum to themid nineteenth century. Enjoy miniconcerts,exhibits, and informationabout the art of historical musicperformance.If music of the Middle Ages interestsyou, how about going tohear Sine Nomine Ensemble forMedieval Music?The intimacy of lutes and voices, as performed by the Musiciansin Ordinary will speak to youwhether you are from Mars orVenus.If you'd prefer your baroque musicwith a bit of an adrenalinchargededge, take in an I FuriosiBaroque Ensemble event.Geo~ ;Toronto's Tafelmusik BaroqueOrchestra is one of the finest periodorchestras in the world. Incelebration of music director JeanneLamon's 25 years of inspired leadership,her friends, the MontrealbasedArion Baroque Orchestrahave been invited to perform in aconcert featuring music written fortwo orchestras!Another period orchestra quicklygaining in stature through theirrecordings on the Naxos label isthe Aradia Ensemble.Opera existed before Rossini,Puccini and Wagner. See and hearwhat inspired generations of operacomposers, singers, and audiencesin the historically inspired,ground-breaking productions of internationally-acclaimedOpera Atelier.If you enjoy choral music, youshould hear the Tallis Choir (directedby Peter Mahon, and namedafter the great English composerwhose 500th birthday was celebratedlast year), the well-establishedToronto Chamber Choir (directedby David Fallis), and the fledglingStudio Sixteen (directed byKevin Komisaruk), all of whomoffer some of the most exquisite& Co. LimitedCONSERVATORS & PURVEYORSOF Fine & Rare Violinschoral repertoire in the history ofthe western world.Founded in 1972, The TorontoConsort continues to presentmasterpieces of early music - Medieval,Renaissance and early Baroque- in its programs.Experience the difference inClassical chamber music performedon period instruments aspresented by the Academy ConcertSeries, or the juxtaposition ofold and new, again on period instruments,in the Scaramella series.Toronto is home to people whomake or mend historical keyboardinstruments (Claviers Baroques),and clarinets (Stephen Fox), aswell as enthusiastic advocates fortheir own particular instrument specialty,such as Joelle Morton' sGreat Bass Viol, or Thomas Georgi'sviola d'amore.And then there are people whojust love to play early music -T.E.M.P.O. - the Toronto EarlyMusic Players Organization.WholeNote's listings and advertisementsin any issue will includemany of these ensembles. Mosthave websites (listed below) whereyou can find details of their concerts,and samples of their music.An Internet Early Music Treasure Map.Just follow the links. Bon Voyage!Academy Concert Series - www.academyconcertseries.comAradia Ensemble - www.aradia.caClaviers Baroques - www.claviersbaroques.comGreat Bass Viol, Joelle Morton - www.greatbassviol.comI Furiosi Baroque Ensemble - www.ifuriosi.comMusicians in Ordinary - www.musiciansinordinary.caOpera Atelier - www .operaatelier.com .Stephen Fox historical clarinets - www.sfoxclannets.comScaramella - www.scaramella.caSine Nomine - www.pims.ca/sinenomine.htmlStudio Sixteen - www.studiosixteen.caTafelmusik Baroque Orchestra - www.tafelmusik.orgTallis Choir - www.tallischoir.comToronto Chamber Choir - www.geocities.com/torontochamberchoirThe Toronto Consort - www.torontoconsort.orgToronto Early Music Players Organization - www.chass.utoronto.ca/-dresher/TEMPO/Toronto Early Music Centre - www.interlog.com/-temcViola d'amore - www.violadamore.comFrank T. Nakashima (franknak@interlog.com)is the President of the Toronto Early Music CentreDEER PARK CONCERTS129 St. Clair Avenue West (just east of Avenue Road)Saturday-Night Organ Recital SeriesPresents its 37'h season201 Church St.. Toronto, ON. M5B IY7 Email: ghcl@idi~ect.comTel: 416-363-0093. Filx : -J.16-'.'6>-005."www.georgehe1nl.comCanada's foremost violin experts.Proud of our heritage. Excited about the future .DANCE & DANCE-ABILITYA 19th Century English Country Dance WorkshopFriday, Sept. 22, 7:30-10 p.m.Historic Fort York100 Garrison RoadFree Parking416-392-6907 Ext 100• Dances fun & easy to learn• Authentic period setting• No partners required• Beginners welcome• Pre-registration required• per person includeslight historic refreshments~TORONTOCulturewww.toronto.ca/museumsOrganistSamuel KummerSaturday October 14, 2006, 7:30 p.m.Performing works of Buxtehude,Bach, Mozart, Vivaldi, Durufll! andimprovisatfon from themes submitted by the audience!Next concerts in seriesDenis Bedard, February 3, 2007Eugenio Maria Fagiani, March 17, 2007William Wright, May 5, 2007Series Tickets: $ 60.00 for four concertsGeneral admission$ 20.00Students: $ 15.00Call 416-571-3680 for ticket information or visitwww.deerparkunitedchurch.ca, click "Concerts"WWW. THEWHOLENOTE .COM

I have spent thepast ten Julys ofmy life burning upthe high way betweenToronto andElora, taking part inthe annual EloraFestival, a highlyvaried event whosefocus is on choralmusic. Under theguise of a "sabbatical,"artistic directorNoel Edisonsupposedly took iteasy this summerand gave over anumber of the festival's concerts toguest choral conductors.I say "supposedly" becauseCHORAL Sceneby Larry Beckwith"'·... ' \ ./'?''.·Edison managed todirect the openingnight performance of Robert Levin'sversion of the Mozart Requiem,as well as a demanding programof opera excerpts featuringthe Toronto Mendelssohn Choir,Richard Margison and John Fanning,and a memorable reading ofMahler's 2nd Symphony with soloistsDonna Brown and SusanPlatts near the end of the festival.It was a revelation to work withhis guest conductors and be exposedto new and stimulating approachesto the art of singing. Wewere introduced to three of Montreal's leading choral conductors,each of whom has distinctive andprodigious gifts .Julian Wachner's encyclopedicknowledge of harmony and form ,BOSLEYREAL ESTATEBV$LE. Y UAL ESTATE LT[!., f:E ALTO P.PETER MAHONSales Representative416-322-8000pmahon@trebnet.comwww.petermahon.comPeter DijkstraChristopher Jackson's humility anddeep devotion to text, and WayneRiddell 's expansive and ecstaticmusical interpretations made lastingimpressions and brought a palpableexcitement to the music-makingat the this year's festival.A highlight for me, though, wasthe intensive week spent rehearsinga demanding program of moderna cappella works under the directionof the 28-year-old Dutchlj ; r 1'I'.M.~ AINT 'fllt.)M.l\S 1 SCONTI NUES:J KE A T COl l.i' O!: E~ ~ S ER :E.::: :::7 ·------ 250

Volumes 21-25 (2015-2019)

Volume 25 Issue 4 - December 2019 / January 2020
Volume 25 Issue 2 - October 2019
Volume 25 Issue 1 - September 2019
Volume 24 Issue 8 - May 2019
Volume 24 Issue 7 - April 2019
Volume 24 Issue 6 - March 2019
Volume 24 Issue 5 - February 2019
Volume 24 Issue 4 - December 2018 / January 2019
Volume 24 Issue 3 - November 2018
Volume 24 Issue 2 - October 2018
Volume 24 Issue 1 - September 2018
Volume 23 Issue 9 - June / July / August 2018
Volume 23 Issue 8 - May 2018
Volume 23 Issue 7 - April 2018
Volume 23 Issue 6 - March 2018
Volume 23 Issue 4 - December 2017 / January 2018
Volume 23 Issue 3 - November 2017
Volume 23 Issue 2 - October 2017
Volume 23 Issue 1 - September 2017
Volume 22 Issue 9 - Summer 2017
Volume 22 Issue 8 - May 2017
Volume 22 Issue 7 - April 2017
Volume 22 Issue 6 - March 2017
Volume 22 Issue 5 - February 2017
Volume 22 Issue 4 - December 2016/January 2017
Volume 22 Issue 2 - October 2016
Volume 22 Issue 1 - September 2016
Volume 21 Issue 9 - Summer 2016
Volume 21 Issue 8 - May 2016
Volume 21 Issue 6 - March 2016
Volume 21 Issue 5 - February 2016
Volume 21 Issue 4 - December 2015/January 2016
Volume 21 Issue 3 - November 2015
Volume 21 Issue 2 - October 2015
Volume 21 Issue 1 - September 2015

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