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Volume 12 - Issue 2 - October 2006

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  • Toronto
  • October
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~infqniaiorOfiLONURHAN ARMANMUSIC DIRECTORToronto's Premier Chamber OrchestraComing up on our Masterpiece Series !Saturdays, 8 pm, Grace Church-on-the-Hill, 300 Lonsdale RdBEETHOVEN'S WORLD Oct 7Richard Raymond, PianistA shimmering portrait of our coastsand forests opens a vista filled byearthy Russian wit andBeethoven's magisterial vision of lifein a vast universeAUTUMN COLOURS Nov 18Jesus Amigo, ConductorAngela Park, PianistEtsuko Kimura, ViolinistTwo superb soloists intertwine lyrical lines,a Canadian paints an imaginary world , andMozart's last chamber scoreCHAUSSON Concerto for Violin and PianoHARRY FREEDMAN Fantasy and AllegroMOZART Quintet K614 orchestral versionCHAN KA-NIN The Land BeautifulBEETHOVEN Piano Concerto No. 2SHOSTAKOVICH Quartet No. 1BEETHOVEN Grosse FugueCHRISTMAS FANCIES Dec 9Ballet EspressivoFloortje Gerritsen, ViolinistCorelli's best-loved work,Mozart's silvery violin, a playful scherzo,the Gallant Knight's adventuresin a vivid ballet, and favourite carolsCORELLI Christmas ConcertoMOZART Violin Concerto # 2ANDRE PREVOST ScherzoTELEMANN Don QuixoteGADE Ch ildren's Christmas EveSingle tickets: , , $12Subscribe and save!7-concert Masterpiece Series: 9, 9, Buy at www.sinfoniatoronto.com or 416 499 0403T.O. 1usical Diaryby Colin EatockRing of Truth?It seems like nothing in the music world makes tongues wag likeWagner's Ring cycle. People aren't content to show up and sit therefor 16 hours - they want to huddle in little groups at intermissionand talk about what's unfolding on stage. And so it was at theCOC's recently concluded cycle.There was, I think, general approval within the audience forBradshaw's conducting, and for the COC Orchestra. Other aspectsof the production were more controversial, however. While 1 istenersexpressed widely varying opinions about the cast, the Big Issue wasthe non-traditional, post-modern, staging of the cycle, and theCOC's decision to engage one designer yet four different directors -one for each opera.September 13, 2006: About a hundred people arrive at the FourSeasons Centre for an afternoon discussion about Ring stagings,following the first performance of Das Rheingold the evening before.Present for the panel discussion, moderated by Wayne Gooding ofOpera Canada magazine, are the English critic Andrew Porter andthe German dramaturge Dorothea Glatt. Much of the discussionfocuses on the way things were done 50 years ago - but when it'stime for questions from the audience, some people want to talk aboutthe way things were done last night. The panelists seem reluctant topass explicit judgement on the COC's production. Porter's remarkssuggest that he's not entirely pleased with what he saw. On theother hand, Glatt offers implied support for Michael Levine (whodesigned all four operas, and also directed Rheingold) with herpronouncement that "the theatre cannot be a museum."That night, however, some people in the audience for DieWalkii.re are more willing to offer their explicit opinions. Whendirector Atom Egoyan takes a bow from the stage , he's booed by asmall but vocal minority - a rare occurrence in Toronto the Polite.September 16, 2006: Today's panel discussion about theRing takesplace at the COC's headquarters on Front St. E. This audience, Isoon learn, is peppered with "Wagner groupies" who travel theworld in search of Ring cycles. A woman from California had seen40 of them.One speaker, Prof. David Levin, of the University ofChicago, addresses the charge that the COC is staging "incoherentnonsense" (as he had heard one audience member remark).Eloquently, he praises the Toronto Ring for probing andunderscoring the inconsistencies inherent in the work. Yet it's clearthat not everyone in the audience agrees with him. One manrhetorically asks the panel (which included Michael Levine) if, inaddition to altering Wagner's stage directions, it should also be okayto change the music and the text. Levine cleverly points out thatthere is in fact a long history of cuts and abridgements to Ringproductions.September 23, 2006: I find myself at yet another panel discussion,at the COC's headquarters . Here, I learn that the Californian who'sseen 40 Ring cycles has been upstaged by someone from Barcelona,in Toronto to see her 107th Ring. Afterwards I talk to OperaCanada's Gooding about audience reaction , and the need somepeople feel for "authenticity," or literal adherence to Wagner'sintentions."For a people seeing this cycle for the first time, it is not aneasy Ring ," he suggests. "It's very dark , and people have troublewith the idea of a forest that's in Sieg fried's mind. But there's also alot of enthusiasm. "Personally, I found the Toronto Ring fascinating, if at timesfrustrating. And while I consider myself open to imaginative reworkingsof operas, I' m a little alarmed by the thought thatunconventional stagings of the Ring have become so pervasive thatthere's really only one cycle left in the world - at the Met in NewYork - that Wagner would recognize as his own work. And thatproduction, I hear, will soon be mothballed. But perhaps, a fewyears down the road, the next "innovation" will be a historicalstaging. Maybe that's something for Opera Atelier to consider.Colin Eatock is a Toronto-based composer and writer, whofrequently contributes to the Globe and Mail and other publications.14Back to Ad IndexW W W. TH EWHO LENOTE .COM

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Volume 26 (2020- )

Volume 26 Issue 1 - September 2020
Volume 26 Issue 2 - October 2020

Volumes 21-25 (2015-2020)

Volume 25 Issue 9 - July / August 2020
Volume 25 Issue 8 - May / June 2020
Volume 25 Issue 7 - April 2020
Volume 25 Issue 6 - March 2020
Volume 25 Issue 5 - February 2020
Volume 25 Issue 4 - December 2019 / January 2020
Volume 25 Issue 3 - November 2019
Volume 25 Issue 2 - October 2019
Volume 25 Issue 1 - September 2019
Volume 24 Issue 8 - May 2019
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Volume 24 Issue 4 - December 2018 / January 2019
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Volume 24 Issue 2 - October 2018
Volume 24 Issue 1 - September 2018
Volume 23 Issue 9 - June / July / August 2018
Volume 23 Issue 8 - May 2018
Volume 23 Issue 7 - April 2018
Volume 23 Issue 6 - March 2018
Volume 23 Issue 4 - December 2017 / January 2018
Volume 23 Issue 3 - November 2017
Volume 23 Issue 2 - October 2017
Volume 23 Issue 1 - September 2017
Volume 22 Issue 9 - Summer 2017
Volume 22 Issue 8 - May 2017
Volume 22 Issue 7 - April 2017
Volume 22 Issue 6 - March 2017
Volume 22 Issue 5 - February 2017
Volume 22 Issue 4 - December 2016/January 2017
Volume 22 Issue 2 - October 2016
Volume 22 Issue 1 - September 2016
Volume 21 Issue 9 - Summer 2016
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Volume 21 Issue 6 - March 2016
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Volume 21 Issue 4 - December 2015/January 2016
Volume 21 Issue 3 - November 2015
Volume 21 Issue 2 - October 2015
Volume 21 Issue 1 - September 2015

Volumes 16-20 (2010-2015)

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