Views
5 years ago

Volume 14 - Issue 9 - June 2009

Bunnett’s Embracing

Bunnett’s Embracing Voices tour moves across Canada, stopping fora free noon-hour performance at Nathan Philips Square as part of theTD Canada Trust Toronto Jazz Festival on June 30.“Summer is my favourite time to play jazz,” reveals Juno-winningbassist and composer Brandi Disterheft. “Playing outdoors at thefestivals has a special kind of magic, especially when you are playingballads or really swingin’ tunes. The audience gets into it in adifferent way. It’s challengingbecause you’re already sweatingeven before you start to play.”Brandi Disterheft’s sextet willbe touring Canada in late Juneand opens for Dave Brubeckon July 1 at 8pm as part of theTD Canada Trust Toronto JazzFestival.On playing jazz in thesummertime, The WholeNote’sown Jim Galloway laments:“There was a time at the CNEwhen there was a lot of work formusicians in the summer, quitea bit of it jazz, and that’s alllong gone. So when things comealong, I’m happy to play.”On the challenges of playingoutdoors: “If it’s a small groupin an outdoor venue, it can beDisterheftdifficult to get the audience to focus on you. If it’s a big band, youdon’t have that problem. And while I like to play acoustically, in anoutdoor venue you’ve got to have some sort of reinforcement, andthat can make it or break it.”Galloway has been the Artistic Director of the TD Canada TrustToronto Jazz Festival since its inception. On this year’s hot tickets,he says, “It’s great to have the opening concert with Sonny Rollins,because he is one of the very few saxophone giants we have left. It’salways a pleasure to hear him, and he’s a really nice man. I’m alsoexcited about welcoming back Dave Brubeck to the festival. He’s notonly a jazz giant but also a household name. He’s still playing verywell, still inventive. Overall, I guess I’m excited that it’s comingclose, because once it starts, there’s nothing you can do to stop it –let’s hope!”Jim Galloway guests with the Canadian Jazz Quartet at Quotes,June 25 at 5pm and hosts a free noon-hour concert with friends onJuly 4 at Nathan Phillips Square.For the full version of this article – including insights fromAndrew Scott, Adrean Farrugia, Julie Michaels, AmandaMartinez and Dave Restivo – see The WholeNote website, atwww.thewholenote.com.beat by beat: new musicOutdoors and Out of the OrdinaryBy Jason van EykJune generally marks the end of the concert season, and the start ofconsistently warmer weather. This combination allows the city’s newmusic presenters to take their artistic ideas out of doors and into territoriesout of the ordinary, both physically and musically speaking.For “out of the ordinary,” R. Murray Schafer is our master craftsman.His Patria series has taken audiences out into the woods at thebreak of daylight, has required musicians to play on stages suspendedover lakes and for singers to greet the dawn with song while standingin floating canoes. This month, we have the unique treat of experiencingSchafer’s latest creation, The Children’s Crusade. This worldpremiere, a co-production of Soundstreams Canada and the LuminatoFestival, opens June 5 in a repurposed factory at 153 Dufferin Street.PHOTO:ORI DAGAN14 WWW.THEWHOLENOTE.COM JUNE 1 - JULY 7, 2009

In typical Schaferfashion, TheChildren’s Crusadecalls for a uniqueblend of musicalstyles performedby a broad rangeof theatrical andmusical talent. Aswell, the expansiveproduction involvesa sequence of fourdifferent sets,which requires theWarehouse at 151 Dufferinaudience to followcharacters through the performance space: an abandoned manufacturingwarehouse in the Parkdale neighbourhood. Have no fear: thespace has undergone a complete transformation by the artistic teaminto a remarkable environment to support what is sure to be an exceptionalartistic event. To learn more about The Children’s Crusade,visit www.soundstreams.ca. To reserve tickets and learn more aboutsupporting events for this major addition to the Canadian opera repertoirevisit www.luminato.com.From June 4 to 6 the Canadian Music Centre will be hosting 35delegates from 16 countries – some from as far away as New Zealandand South Africa – as part of the International Association of MusicInformation Centres conference. To celebrate their visit, membercountries have submitted recordings of music from bands andVISIT BREEDLOVEensembles for Canadian electronic music artists to remix into an eveningof new music. Canada threw in the music of our Ann Southam, ON BLOORan electronic music pioneer in her own right, for good measure. Andso, on June 6 at the Rivoli, the audience will hear the world cometogether in one big musical remix by electronic music artists Solvent, On Saturday June 13th, visit Breedlove’sminisystem and others. The beats start at 9:30 pm and will keep onuntil the morning hours.travelling showroom as it travels throughGetting to the out-of-doors portion of the month, New Adventuresin Sound Art launches its annual Sound Travels series on the Toronto Toronto on its North American Tour.SeeIslands on June 5. Sound Travels brings sound art to the outdoors ina way that entices the curious and provides a unique experience each and play dozens of hand made guitars, meetand every year. This 11th edition of the annual festival will onceagain feature an expanded set of indoor and outdoor interactive installations,performances, soundwalks, artist talks, the Sound Travelssome of the luthiers, and take advantageofIntensive (three days of workshops and concerts) and the third annualspecial pricing on all Breedlove guitars,Toronto Electroacoustic Symposium. Featured artists include NicolasBernier, Annette Vande Gorne, Ken Gregory, Ken Emig, Milesprizes and giveaways throughout the day.Thorogood, Ben Thigpen and Barry Prophet, with more artists still tobe announced. Keep posted to www.naisa.ca for full details, and theunveiling of both returning and new programming.Meanwhile, in the heart of the city, the Music Gallery launches itsCourtyard Music Series. I’ve only ever once experienced music performedin the semi-private and beautiful surroundings of St. George SATURDAY JUNE 13the Martyr’s courtyard garden, and I will say that it was a unique andenjoyable experience. On June 19 the series launches with the “posteverything”mélange that is Fond of Tigers, followed by the Guelph/210 Bloor St. West TorontoToronto sextet Brides and friends belting out Glenn Branca’s LessonNo. 1. Following events feature Instant Coffee, Contact ContemporaryMusic, Magik Markers and Veda Hille with sound artist ChristofMigone. Full dates and details are available at www.musicgallery.orgor 416-204-1080. Ticket prices range widely, but never top ; withwhat is sure to be limited seating, you’ll want to reserve early.The month’s outdoor concerts close with Soundstreams MinimalMusic Patio Party on June 24 at the Bata Shoe Museum. The eveningfeatures percussionist Russell Hartenberger, member of the legendarypercussion ensemble Nexus, and the Steve Reich Ensemble.With Reich set to premiere a new Mallet Quartet at the end of 2009,QUALITY AND SERVICE SINCE 1890perhaps we can count on Nexus to bring us a definitive rendition herein Toronto sometime shortly after? Time will tell. Until then, comediscover new music, make new friends, relax, unwind and enjoywww.remenyi.commusical surprises. More details are available at the Soundstreams210 BLOOR ST. WEST, TORONTOwebsite or by calling 416-504-1282.STRINGS - PIANOS - SHEET MUSIC - GUITARSJUNE 1 - JULY 7, 2009 WWW.THEWHOLENOTE.COM 15

Volume 26 (2020- )

Volume 26 Issue 1 - September 2020
Volume 26 Issue 2 - October 2020

Volumes 21-25 (2015-2020)

Volume 25 Issue 9 - July / August 2020
Volume 25 Issue 8 - May / June 2020
Volume 25 Issue 7 - April 2020
Volume 25 Issue 6 - March 2020
Volume 25 Issue 5 - February 2020
Volume 25 Issue 4 - December 2019 / January 2020
Volume 25 Issue 3 - November 2019
Volume 25 Issue 2 - October 2019
Volume 25 Issue 1 - September 2019
Volume 24 Issue 8 - May 2019
Volume 24 Issue 7 - April 2019
Volume 24 Issue 6 - March 2019
Volume 24 Issue 5 - February 2019
Volume 24 Issue 4 - December 2018 / January 2019
Volume 24 Issue 3 - November 2018
Volume 24 Issue 2 - October 2018
Volume 24 Issue 1 - September 2018
Volume 23 Issue 9 - June / July / August 2018
Volume 23 Issue 8 - May 2018
Volume 23 Issue 7 - April 2018
Volume 23 Issue 6 - March 2018
Volume 23 Issue 4 - December 2017 / January 2018
Volume 23 Issue 3 - November 2017
Volume 23 Issue 2 - October 2017
Volume 23 Issue 1 - September 2017
Volume 22 Issue 9 - Summer 2017
Volume 22 Issue 8 - May 2017
Volume 22 Issue 7 - April 2017
Volume 22 Issue 6 - March 2017
Volume 22 Issue 5 - February 2017
Volume 22 Issue 4 - December 2016/January 2017
Volume 22 Issue 2 - October 2016
Volume 22 Issue 1 - September 2016
Volume 21 Issue 9 - Summer 2016
Volume 21 Issue 8 - May 2016
Volume 21 Issue 6 - March 2016
Volume 21 Issue 5 - February 2016
Volume 21 Issue 4 - December 2015/January 2016
Volume 21 Issue 3 - November 2015
Volume 21 Issue 2 - October 2015
Volume 21 Issue 1 - September 2015

Volumes 16-20 (2010-2015)

Volumes 11-15 (2004-2010)

Volumes 6 - 10 (2000 - 2006)

Volumes 1-5 (1994-2000)