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Volume 17 Issue 3 - November 2011

  • Text
  • November
  • Toronto
  • Jazz
  • December
  • Arts
  • Symphony
  • Theatre
  • Musical
  • Orchestra
  • Choir

STUDY SAXOPHONE with

STUDY SAXOPHONE with Bruce Redstone.M.M. in Performance, B.A. in Education, 25+years experience, 6 years university instructor,reasonable rates, convenient location, alllevels and styles. bredstone@rogers.com or416-706-8161.WARM EXPERIENCED AMERICAN PIANOTEACHER with sterling credentials, unfailinggood humor, and buckets of patience. RoyalConservatory washouts and adult learners especiallywelcome. Lovely Cabbagetown studio,with easy parking/TTC access. Testimonials:“Now there’s a teacher!” R.D., age 13. “Deeppleasure. Sure beats studying with those Quebecnuns!” S.A., age 50+. Peter Kristian Mose,416-923-3060 or pkmose@planeteer.com. Mystudents have never won any prizes, except forlove of music. (And loyalty.)WISH YOU WERE SINGING? Shy? Sing withan experienced “professional” amateur.Groups or individuals. Occasions. Sliding scale.Call Johanne (416) 461-8425FOR SALEFOR SALE - 70 red youth’s choir gowns,hardly used. .00 each or best offer.905-731-8318. rg.richardson@rogers.comUSED STEINWAY PIANOS: models K, S,M, O, L, A, B www.ontariopianos.comMUSICIANS AVAILABLEBARD – EARLY MUSIC DUO playing recorderand virginal available to provide backgroundatmosphere for teas, receptions or other functions– greater Toronto area. For rates and infocall 905-722-5618 or email us at mhpape@interhop.netVOCAL REPERTOIRE COACH & ACCOM-PANIST / MD - new in town! 6 yrs exp in tertiaryinstitution. Professional MD, excellentsight-reader, accompanist, and teacher.Robert Graham 416 465 4927robertgraham70@gmail.comSERVICESACCOUNTING AND INCOME TAX SERVICEfor small business and individuals, to saveyou time and money, customized to meet yourneeds. Norm Pulker, B. Math. CMA.905-251-0309 or 905-830-2985.AFFORDABLE PSYCHOTHERAPY for helpwith anxiety, depression, and self-defeating behaviour.Linda Tomás, MA (OACCPP).647-380-7684; linda.tomas@gmail.com.First consultation no charge.DO YOU HAVE PRECIOUS MEMORIESLOST ON OLD RECORDS, TAPES, PHOTOSetc? Recitals-gigs-auditions-air checks-familystuff. 78’s-cassettes-reels-35mm slides-etc.ArtsMediaProjects will restore them on CD’s orDVD’s. Call George @ 416 910-1091PERFORMANCE ANXIETY? Overcome yourfears and maximize your performance! Workwith an Anxiety Management Therapist withmore than 20 years experience in the performingarts. For further information visitwww.shaunagrayemotion.caVENUESARE YOU PLANNING A CONCERT or recital?Looking for a venue? Consider Bloor StreetUnited Church. Phone: 416-924-7439 x22Email: tina@bloorstreetunited.orgREHEARSE OR PERFORM IN A BRANDNEW FACILITY Lawrence Park CommunityChurch offers excellent performance and rehearsalspaces, for groups from small (an intimatemusic studio) to large (performance spacewith flexible seating capacity of approximately325) in our newly renovated facility. Amplefree parking available. TTC. Geothermally heatedand air conditioned! For information contactMichael Larkin, 416-489-1551 ext 30 or email:michael@lawrenceparkchurch.ca,www.lawrenceparkchurch.caYOUR CLASSIFIED AD COULD HERE.classad@thewholenote.comCourses of Action continued from page 55will feature the legendary New York artist manager Edna Landau,now retired, who writes the Musical America blog, “Ask Edna,” andwill headline a question-and-answer session. Edna, Ann told me,with business partner, Charles Hamlin, got started in the 1960s inNew York. Struggling to stay in business, they were bought by thesports management company, IMG. After that they never lookedback. In arts management, Ann says, the commissions start to flowabout two years after you start making bookings: it’s just the way itworks, but it does make it difficult to get started.“Career Moves” will help its participants fill many gaps, I am sure,in solving the “knowledge problem”of how to create and sustain acareer as a performer or as a manager, agent or presenter.What, though, of our second problem area – the managementof one’s own goals and expectations? Joan Watson, horn player inthe True North Brass, principal horn in the COC Orchestra, and“October’s Child” in this issue of The WholeNote, has been takingnotes over the course of more than three decades as a professionalmusician and teacher. “Most musicians are not clear about what theywant, don’t know how to get what they want even if they do know,and lose enthusiasm daily for making music,” she says. This has ledto her developing a course, “Goal Setting for Musicians,” to helpmusicians clarify what they want to create, and to help them go stepby step toward those goals, including a mentoring support system.Success, she says, becomes inevitable once you know how to movetowards it.At the root of what she attempts to convey is the belief that howyou do anything is how you do everything. “To learn to be a greatmusician” she told me, “you need to learn to be all around great.You bring to your playing who you are.” The key to moving in thedirection of all around greatness is clarifying goals and then workingtowards them. “I have a passion for clarifying goals five yearsfrom now that encompass every area of my life.”(For her account of how she herself puts into practice what shepreaches, please read the longer version of this story online under“Musical Life” at www.thewholenote.com. And a full description ofthe course can be found at www.creativepeoplecoaching.com.)If you are a musician ready to take a step into a more rewardingcareer and a more fulfilling life, there is help. Give both these offersof assistance serious consideration.Children'sPianoLessonsFriendly, approachable -and strict!Liz Parker416.544.1803liz.parker@rogers.comQueen/BathurstLet YourInner Songbe SungWhole ClassicalVoice training for all ages inall styles of SingingClassical Voice Trainingusing Yoga Postures,Alexander Technique,Mindful Meditation techniques,and Expressive MovementOn Bayview at Eglintonwww.83VoICe.com416 83 VoICe(838-6423)Venue Rental• in the heart of Yorkville• historical heritage building• Steinway Grand Piano• recital and special events• lighting and sound systems• accomodates caterers• reasonable rates35 Hazelton Avenue, Heliconian Hall416-922-3618 rentals@heliconianclub.orgDOWNTOWNCONCERT VENUE• Concert, rehearsal, seminar space• Competitive rates• Intimate atmosphere, warm acoustics• Unobstructed versatile seating for 150• Wedding and reception facilities• Fully accessible• Close to transit and parking• Historic Kensington Church (circa 1858)Church of St. Stephen in-the-Field on College Streetbetween Bathurst & Spadina • 647-638-3550 / 416-921-6350email ststepheninthefields@gmail.com58 thewholenote.comNovember 1 – December 7, 2011

Who isDecember’s Child?Never one to take things sittingdown, she moved to Torontoby herself, as a young teenager.Today she tours internationallyand commutes routinely toBoston, while furiously jugglingchamber collaborations inSouthern Ontario.You’ll find her face no lessthan three times, elsewhere inthis issue of The WholeNote.Think you know who our mysterychild is? Send your best guess tomusicschildren@thewholenote.com.Please provide your mailingaddress just in case your nameis drawn! Winners will beselected by random draw amongcorrect replies received byNovember 22, 2011.Red is best for recitals, andfor everyday! Sporting thefull Nanaimo, circa 1982.We Are All Music’s ChildrenNovember’s Child Joan Watsonmj buellJoan Watson — horn soloist, principalhorn, chamber musician, lecturer andeducator — was born in Dauphin, Manitoba.Presently first horn of the Canadian OperaComany Orchestra and a founding member ofTrue North Brass, she was associate principalhorn of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra for14 seasons, and has been principal horn withthe Esprit Orchestra, New Music Concerts,and the Victoria, Pacific Opera and VancouverOpera Orchestras.You’ve probably heard Watson on theCBC as a chamber musician, and certainly(without knowing who you were hearing) innumerous commercials, television shows andmovie scores.A member of the University of Toronto’sfaculty of music, Watson joined The BostonConservatory faculty this fall. She also teachesa course called “Goal Setting for Musicians”(see Allan Pulker’s column in this issue, or herwebsite creativepeoplecoaching.com).When you look at the childhood photo today?Apparently I’ve had an oral fixation for years!I moved from soprano sax to violin at age 5,played trumpet in grades 3–5 and switched tohorn in Grade 6 for very self-serving reasons.I wanted to win the Best Musician trophy inGrade 12 and realized early on that I neededto be on a different instrument from the banddirector’s son who played trumpet. He wouldlikely win the trophy one year ahead of meand they did not give the trophy to the sameinstrument two years in a row. Horn wasmy only chance I thought the horn couldn’tpossibly be as difficult as everyone said it was.I did win the trophy!My dad took an annual Christmas photoof the whole family with instruments. Musicwas his passion until art took over. He was awonderful watercolourist by the end of his life.He always ran a stage band and my brothersand myself were the sax section, except forone on piano.I took up the horn in 1963 and we took aJoan Watson, with 2011 True North Brasscollaborators (clockwise from Joan)Raymond Tizzard, Barton Woomert,Alastair Kay, Scott Irvine.family photo that Christmas. It was taken just afew days before my mother passed away. I washolding a violin, at age 10. I really treasurethat photo.Early musical memories? Dauphin did not havea school music program. We had a town bandand it was comprised of kids and adults. Thestage band was a mix of people who just lovedto play. The local chiropractor was the guitarist,our band director played lead trumpet, thelead trombonist ran a construction company.They were wonderful passionate musicians.We did play LPs and there was alwaysmusic around the house of some sort. Lessons,rehearsals, chamber music, orchestrarehearsals, etc. Our home was the hub ofDauphin music making. My step motherstarted the Dauphin String Orchestra and aschool music program. She was a concertviolinist and had been in the WinnipegSymphony before coming to Dauphin. Shewas also the founder of the Winnipeg SchoolsOrchestra, still thriving today …Read the full interview at thewholenote.com.CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR WINNERS! HERE’S WHAT THEY WONThe Call of Christmas: An unforgettable afternoon of Christmas music presented by All SaintsKingsway Anglican Church (Dec. 18, 4pm). The concert features The True North Brass with amassed choir, organist Simon Walker and mezzo-soprano Margaret Bárdos, and includes carolsinging.Shawn Grenke, conductor. Joan Sayer wins a pair of tickets. Moussourgsky: Picture at an Exhibition: [TNBRecords 2011] J. Scott Irvine’s version for brass quintet and organ, recorded by True North Brass with Eric Robertsonat All Saints Kingsway Anglican Church, was released November 1, 2011! John Brooker is the lucky winner of this CD.The Call of Christmas [TNB Records, 2008]: a collection of 16 Christmas favourites, in arrangementsby some of Canada’s top musicians, for solo horn, strings, harp and percussion: The winner of this cdis Phoebe Lenez. Songs my Mother Taught Me [2007 Phoenix Records] is a collection of favouritetunes in soothing arrangements (including a couple by tnB’s Al Kay): a musical tribute to Joan’smother: musical memories of love, serenity and safety. This cd goes out to Myrna Foley.Music’s Children gratefully acknowledges Shawn, Ray, Andrea, Michael, All Saint’s Kingsway Anglican Church, and True North Brass.Robert DivitoNovember 1 – December 7, 2011 thewholenote.com 59

Volume 26 (2020- )

Volume 26 Issue 1 - September 2020

Volumes 21-25 (2015-2020)

Volume 25 Issue 9 - July / August 2020
Volume 25 Issue 8 - May / June 2020
Volume 25 Issue 7 - April 2020
Volume 25 Issue 6 - March 2020
Volume 25 Issue 5 - February 2020
Volume 25 Issue 4 - December 2019 / January 2020
Volume 25 Issue 3 - November 2019
Volume 25 Issue 2 - October 2019
Volume 25 Issue 1 - September 2019
Volume 24 Issue 8 - May 2019
Volume 24 Issue 7 - April 2019
Volume 24 Issue 6 - March 2019
Volume 24 Issue 5 - February 2019
Volume 24 Issue 4 - December 2018 / January 2019
Volume 24 Issue 3 - November 2018
Volume 24 Issue 2 - October 2018
Volume 24 Issue 1 - September 2018
Volume 23 Issue 9 - June / July / August 2018
Volume 23 Issue 8 - May 2018
Volume 23 Issue 7 - April 2018
Volume 23 Issue 6 - March 2018
Volume 23 Issue 4 - December 2017 / January 2018
Volume 23 Issue 3 - November 2017
Volume 23 Issue 2 - October 2017
Volume 23 Issue 1 - September 2017
Volume 22 Issue 9 - Summer 2017
Volume 22 Issue 8 - May 2017
Volume 22 Issue 7 - April 2017
Volume 22 Issue 6 - March 2017
Volume 22 Issue 5 - February 2017
Volume 22 Issue 4 - December 2016/January 2017
Volume 22 Issue 2 - October 2016
Volume 22 Issue 1 - September 2016
Volume 21 Issue 9 - Summer 2016
Volume 21 Issue 8 - May 2016
Volume 21 Issue 6 - March 2016
Volume 21 Issue 5 - February 2016
Volume 21 Issue 4 - December 2015/January 2016
Volume 21 Issue 3 - November 2015
Volume 21 Issue 2 - October 2015
Volume 21 Issue 1 - September 2015

Volumes 16-20 (2010-2015)

Volumes 11-15 (2004-2010)

Volumes 6 - 10 (2000 - 2006)

Volumes 1-5 (1994-2000)