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Volume 2 Issue 10 - July/August 1997

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  • Festival
  • Toronto
  • August
  • Classical
  • Elora
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wholenote Readership

wholenote Readership Questionnaire July/august '97 wholenote 14. Do you think wholenote contributes to increase audience size? __yes no 15. Do you read the advertisements in wholenote? __yes __ no __ scan 16. Event ads are placep in close proximity to the corresponding listing. In your opinion how important is proximity of ads to listings in drawing your attention to a particula~ event? __ not important __ slightly important __ important __ very important 17. Do you find the product and setvice ads helpful and informative? __yes no 18. Do you refer to these ads when seeking a product or setvice? __yes no 19. Would you purchase wholenote if offered at a selling price? __yes no 20. Demographics: Are you: __ male __ female Please indicate approximate age category: under 30 30-49 50-64 65 + Please indicate level of education: __ high school __ some college/university __ college diploma __ university degree __ advanced degree other Please indicate family income (optional): _under ,000 _.- - _over ,000 Please supply first 3 digits of your postal code: Thank you for your co-operation; wholenote invites your additional comments and suggestions. Please feel free to attach. Your contribution is helping wholenote to setve the community. Please MAIL or FAX this questionnaire by July 31; 1997 to: wholenote Survey, 60 Bellevue Ave., Toronto, Ontario MST 2N4 Fax: (416) 603-3787 In addition, by submitting this questionnaire you become eligible to win a draw for concert tickets. Please choose any 8-digit number: The first 4 digits of winning entries will be published in the September issue of wholenote. Winners may then contact us with the final 4 digits to authenticate their entry. TORONTO'S ONLY COMPREHENSIVE MONTHLY CLASSICAL & CONTEMPORARY CONCERT LISTING SOURCE

31 PUBLISHER'S NOTEBOOK continued from page 2 houses elsewhere in order to live in Canada. Many of them are now underemployed, teaching privately or working in areas other than music. So the school provides these musicians employment at what they do best, and makes an underutilized resource available to the community. And multicultural Toronto gets a truly international music school, with instruction available in a variety of languages. New York, Ms Liu points out, accommodates six major music schools. In her opinion, Toronto easily had room for another. Already the school's professional opera program is under way, complete with masterchisses with an impressive array of internationally renowned teachers. we will be keeping you up to date on the school's development. AMILY RCH Less happy was the news that the Church Of the Holy Family, referred to by John Tuttle in an earlier WholeNote article on liturgical music, was destroyed by fire early in June. During the reconstruction the two sung Sunday masses will be next door in the Holy Family School gym, where the acoustics according to organist/choirmaster, Peter Bishop, are surprisingly good. Daily weekday masses are being held at Parkdale United Church, which offered its help immediately after the fire. Musicians in our Midst: Portrait #3 Gary Kulesha On our cover this month, Gary Kulesha -- a Toronto native who has earned an enviable international reputation as a composer while maintaining an active career in his home city. This summer he will be equally involved in music in Toronto and outside it. In Toronto he will conduct the Composers' Orchestra, on July 26. Out of town, at the Festival of the Sound, he is responsible for the "Discovery" series of concerts of music by young composers. Both are the outcome of workshops with "emergent" composers, whose cause is a passionate concern for Gary. This concern has been at the forefront of his activities in one of his other jobs. For the past two years as composer-in-residence · with the Toronto Symphony Orchestra he has been instrumental in bringing together the TSO and promising young Canadian composers, such as Kelly Marie Murphy, Jeff Ryan and Barbara Croall. Gary understands the situation of the unrecognized composer as well as anyone. He wrote his first composition at the age of eight and around the age of 17 began composition lessons with Sam Dolan. After finishing high school he made private composition studies the focal point of his post-secondary school education. He earned his ARCT in composition and then with the help of Canada Council grants continued his studies first with John McCabe in London, England and then with John Corigliano in New York. At the age of eighteen he received his first commission, a march, for the Scarborough Concert Band. The deal included copying the parts (a lot of work) and conducting it, all for the less than princely sum of fifty dollars! Gary Kulesha has created a highly individual career path in which he is making an extraordinary contribution to the cultural life of the community and the individual lives of a growing number of aspiring composers. MUSICIANS IN OUR MIDST is photographed by Michael Shaw, ASHLEY & CRIPPEN PHOTOGRAPHERS 200 DAVENPORT ROAD (416)925-2222 INDEX OF PRESENTERS JULY/AUGUST 1997 List is "presenters • (bold in the listings) only. Numbers are day of the month, not page. "A • means August. lOOth Monkey Oasis 6 40 fingers 17-19 AGO 10, 16, 23, 30, A6, A13,A20,A24,A27 Art in Open Spaces & Danceworks 12, 13 Ashkenaz: A Festival of New Yiddish Culture A25-28, A30-S 1 COC A26-28 Choir of King's College, Cambridge A29 Church of the Holy Trinity . 7, 14, 21 City of Toronto Parks & Recreation 6, 12, 13, 19, 20, 26, 27, A2, A3, A9, A10, A16, A17, A23, A24, A30, A31 Community Folk Art Council & Polish Society in Canada 12 Composers' Orchestra 26 Elora Festival 11-13, 17-20, 22-27, 31-A3 Etobicoke Community Concert Band 9, 30 Festival of the Sound 18-20, 22-27, 30-A 10 Georgian Theatre A9 Harbourfront 5-6, A4 Hart House 12, 19, 26, A2 Hart House Singers 31 Heritage Associates 1 2 Heritage Theatre 23 Huntsville Festival 10-20 Kingston Summer Festival 14, 21, A4, A18 Mazik Klezmer Band A 14 McMichael Collection 6, 20, A3,A17 Mel Lastman Square 6, 13, 20, 27, A3:A10, A17,A24,A31 Municipality of Metropolitan Toronto 10, 17, 24, 31, A7, A14, A21, A28 Music Gallery A 10 Nathan Phillips Square 23, A6,A7,A20 National Band of the Naval Reserve 31 Natnl. Youth Orchestra 23 North York Concert Band 17, 31 Organ Alternatives & St. James' 6, 13, 20, 27, A3, A10, A17, A24 Orillia Parks & Recreation Department 6, 13, 20, 27, A3,A10,A17,A24,A31 Premiere Opera 27 Royal Bank Seniors' Jubilee Concert A 11-15 The Singletarian Network 30 Thornhill Chamber Music Institute 21-25, 28-30, A 1 We Are One Theatre 3 TORONTO'S ONLY COMPREHENSIVE MONTHLY CLASSICAL & CONTEMPORARY CONCERT LISTING SOURCE

Volume 26 (2020- )

Volume 26 Issue 1 - September 2020
Volume 26 Issue 2 - October 2020
Volume 26 Issue 3 - November 2020

Volumes 21-25 (2015-2020)

Volume 25 Issue 9 - July / August 2020
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