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Volume 25 Issue 5 - February 2020

  • Text
  • Composer
  • Performing
  • Orchestra
  • Arts
  • Theatre
  • Musical
  • Symphony
  • Jazz
  • Toronto
  • February
Visions of 2020! Sampling from back to front for a change: in Rearview Mirror, Robert Harris on the Beethoven he loves (and loves to hate!); Errol Gay, a most musical life remembered; Luna Pearl Woolf in focus in recordings editor David Olds' "Editor's Corner" and in Jenny Parr's preview of "Jacqueline"; Speranza Scappucci explains how not to reinvent Rossini; The Indigo Project, where "each piece of cloth tells a story"; and, leading it all off, Jully Black makes a giant leap in "Caroline, or Change." And as always, much more. Now online in flip-through format here and on stands starting Thurs Jan 30.

Bob Cooper silence

Bob Cooper silence voices and conversations about what it means to be black in Canada and America. It’s time for more conversations and this choral one is worth having. February 7, 7:30pm. The Nathaniel Dett Chorale presents Harriet Tubman: When I Crossed That Line to Freedom in concert. Music and Libretto by Nkeiru Okoye. Tribute Communities Recital Hall, Accolade East, York University. Nobody Writes Songs About Pipelines for Good Reason March 7, Chorus Niagara presents “Touch the Earth Lightly.” Conductor Bob Cooper shares in an interview that “This concert is about the environment.” He’s leading Chorus Niagara in a concert to educate, inspire, and commit for action on the environment. “Given the last election, the climate has always been on the order paper, but never in this way.” With fires burning out of control all across the continent of Australia, forest fires burning the lungs of the planet in the Amazon, the Canadian government investing heavily in more oil extraction and transportation, and Fridays For Future strikes happening around the world – there are so many conversations about the environment happening right now. Music can be a vital way to have a discussion about the world we should all be trying to build. For this concert, Cooper is premiering Canadian composer Tawnie Olson’s That’s One Small Step, inspired by the landing on the moon. “She has taken various speeches and actual copy from mission control from the 1969 mission,” shares Cooper, combining them into an “austere, rhythmically challenging contrast” that explores the infinitesimal, yet vital, planet we live on in an infinite universe. The piece is accompanied by projections on screen, Cooper says: “We’ve pulled the images from NASA to create a montage from the Tawnie Olson landing on the moon.” Much time has passed since that lunar landing but it has been catapulted back into mainstream discourse with the Apple TV+ non-historical drama, For All Mankind. Space has always captured the minds and hearts of humans, the epitome of which has been the lunar landing. The main focus of the concert, however, is Norwegian composer Ola Gjeilo’s Sunrise Mass. This beloved work has become a staple of choral repertoire since it was premiered in 2008, placing the familiar text of a Latin mass into a deeply atmospheric and evocative musical composition. For the mass, Cooper is also using projections, developed two years ago and premiered with another of his ensembles, the Orpheus Choir. The projections will match the music, giving shape and form to the sounds. In The Spheres, for example, Cooper’s projections match the planets evolving and coming into form. The mass will also include a glorious sunrise. “I’ve tried to find ways to interpret visually what the music is saying and doing… By and large, choirs aren’t that interesting to look at. In this day and age, when people are so overstimulated, we have to find ways for people to connect to the music,” Cooper says, and he’s right in this assessment. Traditionally, choirs evoke in a non-visual way: the task of the chorister is never to stand out, always be part of a larger whole, contributing to something greater than oneself without overdoing it. There are some important lessons for ecological protection we can take from this aspect of choral music making. But there needs to be something more. “Because we deal with text in choral music,” shares Cooper, “we have a responsibility to make our music making as relevant as possible.” Choral music is a niche art form. We like to think that we can be as broad-based and entertaining as other art forms. We obviously want to open choral music to be as broad-based and JAZZ WITH PASSION Robert Cooper Artistic Director Saturday, February 29, 2020 @ 7:30pm Grace Church on-the-Hill, 300 Lonsdale Road SPECIAL GUESTS: John Sherwood jazz pianist Melissa Davis gospel singer Passions are stirred in this creative fusion of jazz, gospel and choral music, highlighted by the Canadian premiere of Will Todd’s evocative Easter oratorio, Passion Music. Tickets -. For information call 416-530-4428 or visit OrpheusChoirToronto.com VERN & ELFRIEDA HEINRICHS SANDRA PARSONS ROBERT SHERRIN PETER SIDGWICK 32 | February 2020 thewholenote.com

JESSICA GRIFFIN Ola Gjeilo relevant as possible.” No composer sets words to music without specific reason; there’s actual meaning to those words which, once discovered, is deepened by a musical setting. Overall, in today’s concert halls, fewer tailcoats, more organic experiences, and less highbrow presentations help all music, not just choral music, come alive. In this day and age of Instagram and YouTube, presenting concerts as though we’re in 18th-century Vienna no longer works. Our audiences have changed and evolved. They’re out on the streets fighting for environmental protection, they are filming Instagram stories about daily injustices on their commutes, they are empowering Indigenous voices of the Wet’suwet’en on Twitter during their lunch breaks, they are looking for discussions to be part of. It’s time for choirs to create space to be part of those conversations. As a singer, when I’m looking for inspiration to sing the high G on a Sanctus, I can tell you that it isn’t devoid of meaning. It might sound like a G, but sometimes it is me singing “Thank you for being here. Thank you for being present.” And sometimes it is “This note, this offering is for all the voices out there fighting for a better world. I stand with you. Join me.” Come ask me sometime; I’ll tell you which times are which, and we can have a conversation about it. March 7, 7:30pm. Chorus Niagara presents “Touch the Earth Lightly.” Conducted by Bob Cooper, the choir is joined by the Niagara Symphony String Orchestra and the Chorus Niagara Children’s Chorus. Partridge Hall, FirstOntario Performing Arts Centre, St. Catharines. CHORAL SCENE QUICK PICKS !! FEB 9, 4PM: The Viva Chamber Singers are joined by the Elmer Iseler Singers in “The Spirit of Peace and Reconciliation.” Co-Conductors Carol Woodward Ratzlaff and Brad Ratzlaff have brought together their Chamber Choir in a program of the work Words, Stories, Truth, A Trilogy in Honour of Canada’s Indigenous Peoples. Mark Sirett won the Choral Canada 2018 Outstanding Choral Composition for this work set to text by Indigenous poet Vera Wabegijig of the Mississauga First Nation and Wikwemikong Unceded Reserve community. Cree composer Andrew Balfour’s Trapped in Stone also features in the concert. Eglinton St. George’s United Church, Toronto. !! FEB 22, 3PM: The Toronto Mendelssohn Vera Wabegiljig Choir presents “Romantics and New Romantics,” a free concert featuring gorgeous German Romantic gems, including Mendelssohn’s Psalm 43 and Brahms‘ O schöne Nacht plus contemporary treasures like Lauridsen’s Sure on this Shining Night and Ešenvalds’ O Salutaris Hostia. John William Trotter is the guest conductor. Yorkminster Baptist Church. Doors open at 2:15pm. AN DIE MUSICK/TO MUSIC THE ART OF SONG AND BEYOND FRANZ SCHUBERT LIEDER & MASS IN C MAJOR JURGEN PETRENKO, CONDUCTOR THE TALISKER PLAYERS Kendra Dyck, soprano Danielle MacMillan, mezzo Chris Fischer, tenor Bruce Kelly, baritone Qiao Yi Miao Mu, pianist Sunday March 1, 2020 4PM Christ Church Deer Park 1570 Yonge Street at Heath TICKETS: 30.00 437- 344 -1719 torontoclassicalsingers.ca TORONTO CLASSICAL SINGERS transcending tradition Follow Brian on Twitter @bfchang Send info/media/tips to choralscene@thewholenote.com. thewholenote.com February 2020 | 33

Volumes 21-25 (2015-2020)

Volume 25 Issue 7 - April 2020
Volume 25 Issue 6 - March 2020
Volume 25 Issue 5 - February 2020
Volume 25 Issue 4 - December 2019 / January 2020
Volume 25 Issue 3 - November 2019
Volume 25 Issue 2 - October 2019
Volume 25 Issue 1 - September 2019
Volume 24 Issue 8 - May 2019
Volume 24 Issue 7 - April 2019
Volume 24 Issue 6 - March 2019
Volume 24 Issue 5 - February 2019
Volume 24 Issue 4 - December 2018 / January 2019
Volume 24 Issue 3 - November 2018
Volume 24 Issue 2 - October 2018
Volume 24 Issue 1 - September 2018
Volume 23 Issue 9 - June / July / August 2018
Volume 23 Issue 8 - May 2018
Volume 23 Issue 7 - April 2018
Volume 23 Issue 6 - March 2018
Volume 23 Issue 4 - December 2017 / January 2018
Volume 23 Issue 3 - November 2017
Volume 23 Issue 2 - October 2017
Volume 23 Issue 1 - September 2017
Volume 22 Issue 9 - Summer 2017
Volume 22 Issue 8 - May 2017
Volume 22 Issue 7 - April 2017
Volume 22 Issue 6 - March 2017
Volume 22 Issue 5 - February 2017
Volume 22 Issue 4 - December 2016/January 2017
Volume 22 Issue 2 - October 2016
Volume 22 Issue 1 - September 2016
Volume 21 Issue 9 - Summer 2016
Volume 21 Issue 8 - May 2016
Volume 21 Issue 6 - March 2016
Volume 21 Issue 5 - February 2016
Volume 21 Issue 4 - December 2015/January 2016
Volume 21 Issue 3 - November 2015
Volume 21 Issue 2 - October 2015
Volume 21 Issue 1 - September 2015

Volumes 16-20 (2010-2015)

Volumes 11-15 (2004-2010)

Volumes 6 - 10 (2000 - 2006)

Volumes 1-5 (1994-2000)