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Volume 4 Issue 6 - March 1999

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I1 4 HORAL SCENE BY

I1 4 HORAL SCENE BY lARRY BECKWITH There is much excitement at the 103-year old Toronto Mendelssohn Choir, these days. At a somewhat comical press conference at Roy Thomson Hall last month, it was announced that Noel Edison has been named the choir's new permanent conductor. In front of a gathering of notable figures, including Toronto Mayor Mel Lastman, Ontario Minister of Citizenship, Culture and Recreation Isabel Bassett, Hal Jackman, Nicholas . Goldschmidt, Jean Ashworth Bartle and others, Edison eloquently outlined his plans for the futureof the organization. · These include ambitious tours and exchanges, an apprenticeship programme for conductors, and the continuatior1 of a solid relationship with the TSO .. There are two opportunties to catch Edison in concert, this month. On March 7, he conducts the Elora Festival Singers and Orchestra, with a stellar roster of soloists, in a performance of Bach's St. Matthew Passion in Guelph, and on April2, he leads the Toronto Mendelssohn Choir in a Good Friday performance of Braluns' German Requiem with soloists including the powerful young baritone James Westman. Meanwhile, the Toronto Mendelssohn Youth Choir continues to move from strength to strength with a concert on March 6 entitled Hymns for All Time. Guest conductor John Rutter renews his aquaintance with the choir on this occasion and will stay on in Toronto for a few days to record a CD with the group. This is hot on the heels of their successful collaboration on · a Christmas disc for CBC Records. In Edison and TMYC permanent conductor Robert Cooper, the Mendelssohn Choir organization has a dynamic team of leaders. They are not only two of the best choral conductors in the country; they are also driven, powerful and well-connected men witl1 ambitious plans, big dreams and the tenacity to realize them. SoME OTHER CHORAL EVENTS THIS MONTH: The Etobicoke Centermial Choir gives the world premiere of an iulportant new work, Requiem, by Brock, University composer Peter Landey on March 6. Tite Amercian period instrument ensemble and choir Apollo's Fire gives a performance of Bach's St. John Passion on March 9 at the CBC as part of the OnStage series. Later in the month, more Bach Passion performances take place, St. John Passions by the Mississauga Choral Society March 28 and the Metropolitan Festival Choir on April 2, and a St. Matthew Passion performance by the Grace Church on-the-Hill choir with the Aradia Baroque -Ensemble on March 28. The Passions of Bach are, technically, specifically religious works dealing with the trial and · crucifixion of Christ. To followers of other faiths, agnostics, · pantlteists, or atheists these works still offer a rich and profound exploration into tlte deepest and most fundamental aspects of the powerful and tlte powerless, of the individual and the cormnwtity, of life and death. And the music is so gorgeous! Two other concerts of note: The Jubilate Singers move downtown under tlte direction of Brad Ratzlaff and offer a feast of English choral music with the able assistance of organist Ian Sadler on March 13. Tite Tallis Choir offers an authentic recreation of a Renais­ S~ - ... :rffl~tt~· -

male choir March 21 3:00: Scarborough College Choirs March 21 4:30: St. Anne' s Choir March 26 8:00: Llanelli Male Choir of Wales March 27 8:00: Deer Park Vocal Ensemble · March 27 8:00: Opera in Concert Chorus March 27 8:00: TACTUS March 27 8:00: Tallis Choir March 26 3:00: Choirs of Grace Church on-the-Hill March 26 3:00: Mississauga Choral Society March 26 3:00: Rosedale Presbyterian Choir March 26 4pm, 29, 7:30pm York University Chamber Choir March 26 8:00: Choir and soloists, Rosedale United Church March 29 8pm: Elmer lseler Singers March 30 12: Elora Festival Singers CLASSICAL PURSUITS Residential Summer Seminars in Great Books & Opera University of Toronto - St. Michael's College July 25-31, 1999 Remember your university years? Join others from across North America to enjoy serious discussion and local adventure. Immerse yourself in one of the classic works of literature, philosophy and opera. • Plato's REPUBliC • Dostoevsky's CRIME & PUNISHMENT • Dante's INFERNO • Wagner's TRISTAN UND ISOLDE (416) 926-7254 www.utoronto.ca/stmikes Voices of Sprinq '99 tile Aruadeus Gala Auction Enjoy the Silent Auction, an array of great food, door prizes and entertainment, and then bid on great getaways, works of art, recreational gear and more at our Live Auction. Cash bar. · Saturday, March 6, 1999 at 6:30 p.m. Civic Garden Centre, Edwards Gardens (Lawrence Ave. E. at Leslie St.) Free parking. Call ( 416) 322-64 70 for tickets and catalogue. See list of items at http://amadeus.idirect.com RAFFLE PRIZE,BY ....ti~ Stmquest ,000 vacation of your choice, including cruises. TICKETS ONLY 1000 PRINTED! FOR RAFFLE TICKETS, CALL (416) 485-1623 Draw to be held at Auction on March 6 at 10:00 p.m. . Raffle Licence M40461 Explore a variety of musiGal styles in a fun and friendly environment at the Canadian Academy for the Arts & Music Professional training bv qualified instructors Performances in and around Toronto including special guest appearances in All the Kings Voices 1999-2000 Concen Series Register now For information call (416) 223 2833 .Qtber ©®urses: A complete range of theory courses designed to meet the requirements of the Royal Conservatory of Music ' Examinations. ~'4~~ JJ ~) -4 ' Individual or Group Lesso:p.s for: Voice Piano Violin Cello Classical Guitar Chinese Music Instruments Art & Drawing March Break Camp & Summer Camp Canadian Academy for the Arts & Music 143-147 Willowdale Avenue, North York, Ontario, Canada M2N 4Y5 Tel (416) 223-2833 Fax: (416) 223-7783 Website: Htt ://www.Canadian-academ .com - --·· - -- ·---~- - ----------·- ToRONTo's ONLY COMPREHENSIVE CLASSICAL & CONTEMPORARY CONCERT LISTING SOURCE

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