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Volume 4 Issue 7 - April 1999

  • Text
  • April
  • Toronto
  • Theatre
  • Choir
  • Arts
  • Jazz
  • Classical
  • Symphony
  • Bloor
  • Choral

usician in om· Midst

usician in om· Midst Patricia Phillips Wright INTERVIEWED BY ALLAN PULKER As a child in small town Pennsylvania Patricia Phillips Wright was enthralled by the soWld of the organ at the church she attended. She began her musical ~tudies as a very yoWlg child on the piano, but by the time she was in her last year of high school she was the organist at her church. She attended Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, becoming the . assistant organist to her teacher at a big Episcopal church. She later attended the Yale Institute of Sacred Music, from which received her Master's and Doctoral degrees. Now, as the Minister of Music at Metropolitan United Church in downtown Toronto, she presides over the musical activities of one of the largest churches in the city. A good cluirch musician, she explained, has to be one of the most highly trained in the music business - "you need to a skilled perfonner on the a conductor and an arranger. addition, since the job includes encouraging the gifts of others you need t be good with people, including children and you need an understanding of theology and liturgy, ·in order to collaborate intelligently with the clergy in plmming services." , At the centre of Dr. Wright's activities is the organ, a five manual, 8,240 · pipe Casavm1t, the largest in Canada. Then there is the choir, a group of highly talented singers many of whom are solo perfonners. The Music at Metropolitatl concert series, which she orgm1izes, frequently feature choir members- on April 24, for example, choir member, soprat1o Lucy Carrick Wedel will sing, accompanied on guitar and piano by choir member, Benjamin Stein aqd on Celtic harp by Janet Gadeski, who is the church administrator. In addition there are three children's choirs, atld a children's music day camp In the stumner. She also organizes two organ recital series featuring talented young perfonners, called "Organ Futures" in November and May. With respect to her liturgical responsibilities Dr. Wright says she feels especially blessed to have as her collaborator in this area the church's minister, Malcolm Sinclair, who is also a talented singer. (You eat! hear him at tl1e Music at Metropolitatl Concert May 15.) Dr. Wright also feels very strongly about the training of children. At the day cmnp last sununer the children created a musical theatre piece about street kids. Work on it is progressing and tl1e perfonnance will take place at the morning service at Metropolitan on May 2nd. A month before that on Good Friday, April2, her choir with a professional orchestra and soloists will perfonn J.S. Bach's St. Jolm Passion, This will be the sixth time she has conduc.ted the St. Jolm Passion, about which she is very enthusiastic. "It is shorter and more dramatic than the St. Matthew Passion. It has beautiful, contemplative arias, really sublime moments, so much to discover ... the dissonant hannonies on words like "suffer'' and "sim1er" for example .. "Orgat1 Futures" begins again with a recital on May 5 at 5:15. "The idea arose out of discussions betweei\ church members. "We wanted to present atl organ recital series, but didn't want to duplicate the noon-hour series at three other downtown churches. We decided to try 5:30 in the allernoon, and it has worked well - people come in on their way home There are a couple of really keen talented sixteen year olds right now, one studying witl1 me, the other with Jolm Tuttle." Tuttle's student will be among the recitalists in the May series. She also drew my attention to the Royal Canadian College of Organists' ~'Toronto Organ Day" Saturday, May I. The Metropolitan organ will be featured .. "This is a very creative place to work," she enthuses. "Malcolm is very creative and he attracts creative people." Her def1ection of credit notwithstanding,. it is clear that she plays no small part in making Metropolitan such a torrent of creativity in the Toronto musical scene. Musicians in our midst is photographed by Michael Shaw. Ashley & Crippen, Photographers 200 Davenport Rd. 416 925-2222 TORONTO's ONLY COMPREHENSIVE CLASSICAL & CONTEMPORi)RY CONCERT LISTING SOURCE WHOLENOTE'S LOOK AT SUMMER CAMPS Last year "fVholeNote introduced its first supplement on summer music education. This year the supplement is even bigger and includes programs for. all ages .. Some programs below accept 6 month old infants, others take seniors. The "All Ages" category means that a program offers courses for students of many ages, but not that each course is open to everyone. "Children and Youth" programs are for those 18 and under. "Young Musicians" are musicians young in experience, but not necessarily age. We have done the best to ensure that all infomwtion is correct and current at time of publication, but please confirm all details including program contents, entrance requirements, deadlines, and pn'ces with the individual organizations. A program s presence on the list is not a WholeNote endorsement. SECTIONS I. All Ages II. Children and Youth III. Young Musicians and Adults IV. Adult Learners PROGRAM Aria International Summer Academy III CAMMAC I Cedar Glen I Canadian Academy for the Arts and Music II Canadian Children's Opera Chorus II Canadian Opera Company II Centuries Opera Association III Canadian Organ Festival III Classical Pursuits IV Creative Artist Productions III Diocese of Toronto 11 Domaine Forget III International School for Musical Arts III Interprovincial Music Camp II Juan Tomas Music Studio III Kingsway Conservatory of Music I National Music Camp of Canada II Ontario Choral Federation II Orford Arts Centre III pro VOCE Studios I Royal Conservatory of Music I Southern Ontario Chamber Music Institute III Southwestern Ontario Suzuki Centre II St. Christopher House Music School I Toronto District School Board -- City of York·II Toronto District School Board -- Etobicoke II Toronto Suzuki Music Camp II University of Toronto Faculty of Music I . University Settlement Music School I Yip's Music Centre II ' .

For more information please contact: Larry Shields, Performance Office University of Toronto Faculty of Music Edward Johnson Building 80 Queen's Park, Toronto ON MSS 2C5 Phone: 416-978-3733 SUMMER SESSION JAZZ RHYTHM SECTION INSTITUTE 1l1e Royal Conservatory of Music probably has the most comprehensive and varied selection of music courses in Ontario, for students of all ages, begi1mer, intennediate, and advanced. 1l1e RCM's Summer Never Sounded So Good program mns between July 5 and August 14 on its in downtown Toronto and Mississauga campuses. RCM offers private lessons for all ages and levels, and. a six-week condensed 1l1eory Class (July 5 to August 7) in preparation for the RCM exam. Courses designed especially for children include Music with Your Baby (6 months to 3 years), Preparatory Music for 3 year olds accompanied. by a caregiver, Eurythmics (3 to 5), Summer Suzuki Plus (3+), and Keyboards and Computers for 6 to 10 year olds with up to 2 years of piano. - I. ALL AGES Adult programs include introductory courses like An Introduction to Singing and Guitar from Scratch, as well as Recorder Ensembles, Baroque Ensembles, and Composition. Music teachers can enhance their professional skills with courses on Piano Pedagogy, Orff Schulwerk, Kodaly Level II, Technology for Music Teachers, and Early Childhood Music Education. For a brochure call416-408- 2825 in Toronto or 905-891-7944 in Mississauga. 1l1e CAMMAC Cedar Glen Summer Music Centre enters i(s 22nd season this year. Located · in the Caledon Hills near Bolton, Ontario, Cedar Glen otl'ers two one-week sessions for amateur musicians of all levels, ages 12 to adult, from July 25 to August I, and again from August I to 8. l( -~~~ ,;\f);S)[( ~ ;\j[ 1 j[ ')UJ[{;S tUJ[v][';S Residential Summer Seminars in Great Boob 4 Opera University of St. Michael's College, University of Toronto July 25-31, 1999 Remember your universily years? Join others from across North America to enjoy stimulatixig discussion and local adventure. Immerse yourself in one of the classic works of literature, philosophy and opera. • Plato's REPUBUC • Dostoevsky's CRIME & PUNISHMENT • Dante's INFERNO Wagner's TRISTAN UNDISOIDE ( 416) 1)26-7254 www.utoronto.ca/ stmikes July 5 - 9.' l 999 Monday through Friday 9 am- l pm Learn how to swing from Canada's leading jazz performers in a five-day course featuring daily rehearsals and masterclasses with such artists as Gary Williamson (piano], Lorne Lofsky (guitar), Barry Elmes (drums), Dave Young (bass) and Paul Read (Director of Jazz Studies). Students will study improvisa~ion, participate in daily classes fm their own instrument and try out their new skills in ensemb!e performances. Open to students from . high school to preprofessional level. Course fee: 0. Music Theory Institute Music Foundation Courses July 6 - August 5. l 999 Tuesdays, Wednesdays & Thursdays Solidify your musical genius with a strong foundation in music theory and harmony. Four courses, Theory 2, Harmony 3, Harmony 4 and H?rmony 5, are taught by award-winning composer/pianist and U ofT faculty member Larysa Kuzmenko, who has years of success in preparing students· for RCM exams. Each course meets three times weekly for oneand-a-half hours each day. Course fee: 0. SUMMER BRASS INTITUTE Essential Brass Skills August 9 - J 3, l 999 Monday through Friday 9 am- l pm featuring THE CANADIAN BRASS YAMAHA ARTISTS I N RESIDENCE Thi s immensely popular summer course features The Canadian Brass and U of T's brass faculty teaching brass players in large ensembles, masterclasses and chamber groups. Students will have the opportunity to attend open rehearsals, demonstration concerts and coachings by The Canadian Brass. Open to trumpet, . horn, trombone, euphonium and tuba players from intermediate to preprofessional level. Course fee: 0. Scholarships available. TORO NTO's ONLY COMPREtiENSIVE CLASSICAL & CONTEMPORARY CONCERT LISTING SOURCE

Volumes 21-25 (2015-2019)

Volume 25 Issue 4 - December 2019 / January 2020
Volume 25 Issue 2 - October 2019
Volume 25 Issue 1 - September 2019
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Volume 24 Issue 7 - April 2019
Volume 24 Issue 6 - March 2019
Volume 24 Issue 5 - February 2019
Volume 24 Issue 4 - December 2018 / January 2019
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Volume 22 Issue 2 - October 2016
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Volume 21 Issue 9 - Summer 2016
Volume 21 Issue 8 - May 2016
Volume 21 Issue 6 - March 2016
Volume 21 Issue 5 - February 2016
Volume 21 Issue 4 - December 2015/January 2016
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Volume 21 Issue 2 - October 2015
Volume 21 Issue 1 - September 2015

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