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Volume 5 Issue 6 - March 2000

  • Text
  • Toronto
  • Theatre
  • Choir
  • Jazz
  • Arts
  • April
  • Musical
  • Glenn
  • Bloor
  • Symphony

&& :utH-fH'r Stephen Fox

&& :utH-fH'r Stephen Fox Canada's largest selection of sheet music titles for strings. Available by fast and convenient mail-order. In-store purchases receive an additional 20°/o discount! As a foil-service string shop we offir the following: + Violins • Violas • Cellos + Rare Instrument and Bow + Instrument Rentals + Strings Accessories, 26 Cumberland, 2nd Floor. Td, 1-416-960·8494 Email' •hal@globaherve.net Free Parking! Open Mon.-Sat. l 0-6 Thurs. until 8 pm. hy Merlin Williams Toronto is blessed with many fine clarinettists, and Stephen Fox is definitely one of that number. His playing with Orchestra Toronto (co-principal clarinet & saxes) and the Riverdale Ensemble is wonderful, but there is one thing that Fox does that sets him apart from all the other clarinet players in this city. Stephen Fox makes his own instruments. Stephen's interest in the clarinet started in tenth grade in 'Saskatchewan. At the time, he wanted to take up the oboe, but ended up with the clarinet instead. He says he's never regretted it, and loves the flexibility of the clarinet. While at the University of Saskatchewan Stephen played in the concert band, and later the Saskatoon Symphony Orchestra. After completing his Masters in Theoretical Plasma Physics, he did a Bachelors in Clarinet Perfonnance. Stephen started doing instrument repairs in 1985 in Saskatchewan. Upon moving to Toronto in 1987, he started working on custom keywork, major alterations and individual ttming of clarinets. The high quality of his work started to attract clients from across Canada, the United States and Europe. In 1990, Steve started making complete instruments. To date, he's made about twenty-five complete clarinets, plus a number of bassett joints (to extend the clarinet range for the Mozart concerto) and bass clarinet extensions. In addition to tl1e standard Bb and A clarinets, tl1e S. Fox line includes Eb & C clarinets, bassett horns, and period clarinets. Steve's instnuuents can also be ordered with three different bore stylesthe brighter French type, the dark Gennan bore, and a newer design based on the principles of acoustician Artlmr Benade. If that weren't enough in the way of variety, the clarinets are also available in several different woods. Steve has used grenadilla (African blackwood, the standard clarinet material), rosewood, cocobolo (a strikingly grained hardwood) and boxwood. Despite all of the variety, the prices ofS. Fox clarinets are comparable to those of the big clarinet manufacturers. It's actually quite a bargain when you factor in the time Steve spends personally tuning and play testing each clarinet. Fox clarinets have attracted a wide variety of players. The best known of these is probably TSO principal clarinettist Joaquin Valdepenas. Valdepenas uses an S. Fox clarinet on a soon-to-be released Amici CD. He also uses his Gennan bore S. Fox instrument for some of his work with the symphony. Other notable players of Steve's instruments include Don Pierre, the clarinettist and leader of the Glenn Miller Orchestra (Canada), and Kurt Bjorling, of the klezmer group "Brave Old World". Stephen Pierre, principal clarinettist of tl1e Hamilton Philharmonic has a bassett joint, and has perfonned on Fox's own personal boxwood period clarinet. If all of that wasn't enough, Stephen also spends about three months each year teaching instrument making at the Musikk Instrument Akademiet in Norway. Steve can be heard playing with the Riverdale Ensemble, with pianist Ellen Meyer and violinist Daniel Kushner, on March 5 at the McMichael Gallery in Kleinburg. ll1e concert starts at I :30 pm, and is free with gallery admission. If you miss that, keep an eye out for the forthcoming CD by the Riverdale Ensemble on the Furiant label.

NOW ACCEPTING CLIENTS/ Contact in Confidence Chuck Homewood Tel: {416) 777·9392 Fax: {416) 203·8981 e-mail: hohum@istar.ca ~~ tfie s ouni post Canada's String Shop violins, violas, cellos & bows expert repairs & rehairs strings & accessories at guaranteed lowest prices Canada's largest stock of string music . fast mail order service all prices in CDN $-Not a US$ price in the store! 93 Grenville St., Toronto MSS 1B~ tel (416) 971-6990 fax (416) 597-9923 Master Classes with Lorne Lofsky One of Canada's Foremost Jazz Guitarists Toronto School of Music Canada Maureen Forrester, Honorary Cltair Colin Yip, President We offer superb musical instruction by a distinguished teachine faculty of world-renowned musicians. International Opera Centre One year professional opera training program with William Shookhofl'as artistic director and performance with orchestral accompaniment. Professional Performance Diploma For high school graduates who wish to become professional musicians. (Piano. Voice. Strings, Woodwinds, Composit;on, Jazz. Chinese Music. Church Music, Opera. Musical Theatre) Professional Advanced Certificate Program Advanced level studies for the professional student. (Piano. Voice. Strings, Woodwinds) Master Classes in Contemporary Music Arranging Techniques with Shelly Berger For more information call ( 416) 2 0 3' -7 7 7 8 or email at musicschool@shellyberger.com visit our web site at www.shellyberger.com The Shelly Berger School of Music 399 Adelaide St. W. (one block west ofSpadina Ave. - 2nd Floor} General usic Education Private or group instruction for children {ages 4 and up) as well as adults from beginners to ad' anced levels. SCHOLARSHIPS available to TALE~TS in ALL DISCIPLINES. For information and registration. please contact Toronto School of Music Canada Downtown: 349 Queen Street West, Suite 201, Toronto, Ont, M5V2A4 Tel. (416) 260-1882 Fax (416) 222-8928 · Nortb York: No. 1 Bowan Court, Nortb York, Ontario, M2K3A8 Tel. (416) 346-6%3 Fax. (416) 222-8928 14 Fifth Sto•ed L.:o••o"f

Volumes 21-25 (2015-2020)

Volume 25 Issue 9 - July / August 2020
Volume 25 Issue 8 - May / June 2020
Volume 25 Issue 7 - April 2020
Volume 25 Issue 6 - March 2020
Volume 25 Issue 5 - February 2020
Volume 25 Issue 4 - December 2019 / January 2020
Volume 25 Issue 3 - November 2019
Volume 25 Issue 2 - October 2019
Volume 25 Issue 1 - September 2019
Volume 24 Issue 8 - May 2019
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Volume 24 Issue 6 - March 2019
Volume 24 Issue 5 - February 2019
Volume 24 Issue 4 - December 2018 / January 2019
Volume 24 Issue 3 - November 2018
Volume 24 Issue 2 - October 2018
Volume 24 Issue 1 - September 2018
Volume 23 Issue 9 - June / July / August 2018
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Volume 23 Issue 7 - April 2018
Volume 23 Issue 6 - March 2018
Volume 23 Issue 4 - December 2017 / January 2018
Volume 23 Issue 3 - November 2017
Volume 23 Issue 2 - October 2017
Volume 23 Issue 1 - September 2017
Volume 22 Issue 9 - Summer 2017
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Volume 22 Issue 7 - April 2017
Volume 22 Issue 6 - March 2017
Volume 22 Issue 5 - February 2017
Volume 22 Issue 4 - December 2016/January 2017
Volume 22 Issue 2 - October 2016
Volume 22 Issue 1 - September 2016
Volume 21 Issue 9 - Summer 2016
Volume 21 Issue 8 - May 2016
Volume 21 Issue 6 - March 2016
Volume 21 Issue 5 - February 2016
Volume 21 Issue 4 - December 2015/January 2016
Volume 21 Issue 3 - November 2015
Volume 21 Issue 2 - October 2015
Volume 21 Issue 1 - September 2015

Volumes 16-20 (2010-2015)

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