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Volume 8 Issue 9 - June 2003

  • Text
  • Festival
  • Toronto
  • Jazz
  • Theatre
  • Musical
  • Concerts
  • Arts
  • Symphony
  • Orchestra
  • Classical

NIA GARA INTERNATIONAL

NIA GARA INTERNATIONAL CHAMBER MUSICFESilVAL l give this festival top marks for the way it celebrates its connection with the two main attractions of the area in which it is located - grape growing/ wine making and the Shaw Festival. Four of the festival's venues are wineries and several concerts are built around the theme of wine and music. The connection with the Shaw Festival is made by three concerts at which some of George Bernard Shaw's music reviews are read aloud and the music reviewed in them is performed- a brilliant piece of programming in my opinion. STRATFORD SUMMER MUSIC The other summer music festival "in the shadow of' a much larger theatre festival is Stratford Summer Music, which is celebrating Glenn Gould's first performance 50 years ago · at the Stratford Festival with a music drama "Glenn Gould Meets Bach" starring Chris Dawes and Peter Tiefenbach. This production, originally commissioned by the Glenn Gould Foundation for its Symposium in 2000 revolves publicly, the first performance around a fictional encounter having been only for delegates between Gould and Johann · to the Gould Symposium. Sebastian Bach himself. Exploring not only Gould's MlLL RACE FESTIVAL prodigious musical abilities This Friday evening and all day and his relationship to the Saturday festival (August 1-2) organ but also his highly in Cambridge, Ontario, presents developed sense of humour, a spectacular selection of these elements come together, traditional folk music from according to Christopher around the world. Folk music is Dawes, in an organ fugue, evidently alive and well and written by Tiefenbach, based · thriving, despite the challenges on the song, "Downtown" by of mass "culture" and pop Petula Clark, popularized when music. Gould was still a young man . This will be the first time this dr;m1a has been presented Buehlow Barn Ayr, On July 4-6 Great music, delicious food and a pastoral setting make the Grand River Baroque Festival the place to be on July 4-6. Six concerts, a dinner and a brunch will be held in the rustic barn on the Buehlow farm near Ayr, Ontario. Friday night's opening concert, an all-Bach program, continues the cantata odyssey begun last summer with performances of BWV 199 and 187, featuring soloists Daniel Lichti, Laura Pudwell and Carolyn Sinclair. Also on the program are Harpsichord Concerto #2 and Brandenburg Concerto #4. Saturday, focusing on the aesthetic struggle between France and Italy, will offer preconcert talks and feature works by Monteverdi on up to Pergolesi, performed on period instruments. Soloists are Kimberly Barber and Karen Baumgartel. The Muses' Respite, an elegant five:.course dinner, will be served in the barn between the afternoon and evening concerts. At IOpm guests will be invited up to the hayloft to delight in hand made cream puffs and succulent nipples of Venus. The day will end with an 11 · pm "moonlight" performance of the Bach Goldberg Variations, performed on harpsichord by David Louie. On Sunday at I lam, "Brunch with Bach" features German bar6que chamber music, and the Festival will conclude with Bach's Mass in B minor with soloists Donna Ellen Trifunovich, Laura Pudwell, Benjamin Butterfield and Daniel Lichti. Adult ticket _prices for concerts .range from - / students from - . Saturday Dinner- Check out our website at www.grbf.ca Phone: 519-273-2908 e-mai I: grbf@golden.netGrandRi verBaroqueFesti val Come and celebrate 200 years of brass and woodwind bands in Canada in the village of Orono on the weekend of June 13, 14, & 15. Enjoy a Spectacular MilitarY Tattoo on Friday evening June 13 1 h featuring the Central Band of the Canadian Armed Fprces. Queens York Rangers, Toronto Sc.ottish Regiment, and Band of the Royal Marines Association, Cobourg. · On Saturday June 14'h start the day with a pancake breakfast in the park with a concert by the Thornhill Swing Band. This is followed by a parade and 12 hours of continuous concerts that include the Central Band of the Canadian Armed Forces, The True North Brass Quintet, Musique a Kiosque from Montreal with Alain Trudel. Finish the evening dancing under · the stars with the Ragweed Jazz Band and the Megacity Swing Band. Sunday begins with an outdoor Church service featuring the Peterborough Temple Salvation Army Band followed by afternoon concerts featuring the Central Band of the Canadian Armed Forces and the Hannaford Youth Band. Ticket prices or festival pass: Friday, Saturday, Sunday The Village of Orono is in Clarington, just east of Oshawa. For info visit our website: www.townbandfestival.com Phone# 1·800·294·55.18 E-mail climenha@oix.com 40 www.thewholenote.com June 1 - July 7 2003

SOUTH CENTRAL SOUTH CENTRAL and high ceiling give it a ' ' MUSIC AT SHARON The history of Sharon Temple and the "Children of Peace" who built it is a fascinating but little known bit of local history. Take a look at the Sharon Temple website to learn more. The site is currently operated by the Sharon Temple Museum Society, which opens it to the public on Sundays, beginning on June 8, for tours, picnics and concerts. I don't suppose the · idealistic bui)ders of the Temple had the benefit of an acoustical consultant, but its wood interior Brott:•~ Hamilton ' i f j ; •Sharon resonance that makes it ideal for music. Look in our listings for details of these concerts and make a date with this remarkable. chapter in Canadian history. TORONTO INTER­ NATIONALCHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL The TrypTych directorial trio of William Shookhoff, Lenard Whiting and Edward Franko, have taken on the challenge of mounting a summer festival for Toronto, the Toronto · International Chamber Music Festival. · jeSTnVAL . of the Arts Th,e Huntsville area in the summer is a wonderful place to be. In addition to the beautiful lakes, world class resorts, Algonqu'in Park, and some of the finest golf courses in the country, the Huntsville Festival of the Arts, for the past ten years, has provided top notch local, national, and international artists on their stage. From its eady beginnings as a classically based music festival based at Deerhurst Resort, the Festival has grown and diversified to present artistic offerings in the fields of jazz, pop, choral; Celtic, country, orchestral, and classical music as well as theatre, written word, poetry, and the visual arts. 2003 will see a continuation of this successful schedul'e with the return of Jesse Cook (for a thifd straight year) as well as Jeff Healey and his Jazz Wizards. Also on the bill this season are jazz piano wizard Michael Kaeshammer, country legends Prair,ie Oyster, and pop/jazz award winner Alfie Zappacosta. For the eleventh straight season Maestro Kerry Stratton will conduct the fully professional Festival Orchestra over two eve.nings, the first featuring the works of Sondheim, Lerner & Lowe, and Rodgers & Hammerstein, and the second an offoring of classical choral works by Richard Strauss as interpreted by celebrated soprano Pamela Hoiles. ·Classical music will be well represented on the program with the presentation of the husband and wife violin/piano team Duo Concertante, the award winning Borealis String Quartet; ·and the choral sounds of the Bel Canto Chorus, touring from Milwaukee, Wisconsin. For tickets and information phone: 705-788-2787, go to the website at www.huntsvillefestival.on.ca or E-mail: info@ huntsvillefestival.on.ca Jazz and Classical musicians head to the beach for the ki\C"'-YJ.l\e ~l.\~t.'\eV' Ml.\StC - festtv""l August 3to16 Fabulous Jazz and Chamber Music concerts combined with daytime classes have made KSMF a preferred summer music destination. Our staff and volunteers . are dedicated to providing the opportunity to work with some of North America's top musicians and teachers. We remain committed to the personalized coaching methods and quality programming in a casual setting that have byilt our repi~tation for over 12 years. · · · •·./, Jazza~ctChamberMusicArtists Gwen' Hoebig,.Erika Raum, Livia Sohn, Roger Chase, Jasmine Schnarr, Simon Fryer, David Hetherington, Peter Shackleton, David Moroz, ~ydia Wong, Jerry Bergonzi, Alex Dean, Mike Mal9ne, Dave McMurdo, Bri~n Dickinson, Pat Collins, Barry Elmes, Lorne Lofsky, Lisa Martinelli The festival incJudes a Jazz week and a Festival week with specialized programs in Jazz, Chamber Music, Band, Strings, Choir, Guitar and Music for Young People. · The Kincardine Summer Music Festival has programs for all ages and abilities. • Beginners of all ages can rent and learn to play the instrument of their choice. • Experienced students are provided with the opportunity to develop their skills • Advanced students can challenge themselves in the Jazz, Chamber music or Vocal programs. I Are you a beginning musician, a young professional interested in refreshing your skills or an advanced student looking for an opportunity to expand your horizons? The· Kincardine Summer Music Festival is an ideal and unforgettable summer music experience. Register on-line atwww.ksmf.ca early and save. Kincardine Summer Music Festival P.O. Box 251, Kincardine ON, N2Z 2Y7 June1 - July 7 2003 www.thewholenote.com ' 41

Volumes 21-25 (2015-2019)

Volume 25 Issue 4 - December 2019 / January 2020
Volume 25 Issue 2 - October 2019
Volume 25 Issue 1 - September 2019
Volume 24 Issue 8 - May 2019
Volume 24 Issue 7 - April 2019
Volume 24 Issue 6 - March 2019
Volume 24 Issue 5 - February 2019
Volume 24 Issue 4 - December 2018 / January 2019
Volume 24 Issue 3 - November 2018
Volume 24 Issue 2 - October 2018
Volume 24 Issue 1 - September 2018
Volume 23 Issue 9 - June / July / August 2018
Volume 23 Issue 8 - May 2018
Volume 23 Issue 7 - April 2018
Volume 23 Issue 6 - March 2018
Volume 23 Issue 4 - December 2017 / January 2018
Volume 23 Issue 3 - November 2017
Volume 23 Issue 2 - October 2017
Volume 23 Issue 1 - September 2017
Volume 22 Issue 9 - Summer 2017
Volume 22 Issue 8 - May 2017
Volume 22 Issue 7 - April 2017
Volume 22 Issue 6 - March 2017
Volume 22 Issue 5 - February 2017
Volume 22 Issue 4 - December 2016/January 2017
Volume 22 Issue 2 - October 2016
Volume 22 Issue 1 - September 2016
Volume 21 Issue 9 - Summer 2016
Volume 21 Issue 8 - May 2016
Volume 21 Issue 6 - March 2016
Volume 21 Issue 5 - February 2016
Volume 21 Issue 4 - December 2015/January 2016
Volume 21 Issue 3 - November 2015
Volume 21 Issue 2 - October 2015
Volume 21 Issue 1 - September 2015

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