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Volume 9 Issue 6 - March 2004

  • Text
  • Toronto
  • Jazz
  • Theatre
  • April
  • Musical
  • Arts
  • Symphony
  • Classical
  • Orchestra
  • Faculty

younger conductors lack

younger conductors lack culture, erudition, flair, and a sense of discovery. Interviewer Cecile Gilly elicits fascinating revelations, such as Boulez's "Utopian ideal" - a gigantic orchestra made up of complete families of instruments, providing "infinite possibilities and combinations". Her informal approach reveals a more accessible facet of one of the most brilliant musicians of our times. Collected Works: A Journal of Jazz 1954 - 2001 By Whitney Balliett St. Martin's Griffen 888 pages .95 From his perch at the New York- . er, Whitney Balliett has dominated the world of jazz writing for the past fifty years. But the pronoun "I" figures as scarcely in his writings as destructive vituperation. Balliett proves that a writer cari. be both appreciative and critical. He savours description, so that, if you don't agree with his judgements, you know why. In fact, Balliett's writing epitomizes the best jazz - cool, passionate, transparent and honest. The most remarkable thing about his writing is how much his melifluous words actually sound like the music he is describing. Eloquent, moving and highly imaginative, he can make an ineffective player sound "like tea being poured". But most rare is his ability to describe greatness, as with Basie, who "has probably not ever played a wrong note, a wrong accent, or a cliche" (check out page 421 for his poetic description of Basie's piano-playing). He loves evocative terms like rococo and acedia, but he is never pompous. His references include books, concerts, recordings, conversations, Broadway, classical music, movies and documentaries. But his sophistication sits lightly because he always writes as though what he is talking about really matters. And, of course, it does. The Harvard Dictionary of Music, Fourth Edition edited by Don Michael Randel Harvard University Press 1007 pages .00 · If you've ever been confused by the bothersome terms andante and andantino, this book will straighten things out. The entry for messa di voce provides a useful definition, but also warns against the frequent confusion with the unrelated term mezza voce. This remarkably comprehensive dictionary covers instruments and their families from around the world, as well as concepts such as acoustics, aesthetics, musical ability, authenticity and tonality. While the core remains western classical Viva Voce Voice Studio A DYNAMIC ONE-OF-A-KIND TEACHING DUO Deborohjeons Soprano, Mus.Bae. Performance, Diploma in Operatic Performance, University of Toronto Andree Bernard Chanteuse, Jazz singer, Laval Universi Preparation for entrance exams and auditions, all styles and levels 7 Pleasant Blvd. (Yonge and St. Clair) . 416- 323-l417 music, various styles of music such as jazz, salsa, and rap are now included. · Only works with titles or nicknames are listed, so that while Beethoven's Wellingtons Sieg gets an entry, his far more important Ninth Symphony does not. The impressive list of contributors includes a number of Canadians. John Beckwith and Kathleen Mc­ Morrow contribute an informative section on Canada. But, while The Star-spangled Banner and La Marseillaise receive an entry, 0 Canada doesn't. Entries are succinct and reliable. Many feature invaluable bibliographies, musical examples, and helpful drawings. Cross-references help make browsing a pleasure, as do the accessible layout and fine paper. . " ; Bach, The Fencing Master: Reading aloud from the first three cello suites; 2nd edition By Anner Bylsma Bylsma Fencing Mail, Amsterdam 200 pages .00 US "Dear reader, let's be careful with doing 'simply the same'!" With this challenge Anner Bylsma introduc­ es his analyses of the first three of Bach's six solo cello suites, based '--" on the score prepared by Bach's i i i. second wife, Anna Magdelena Bach. The heart of Bylsma's argument is that the irregular slurs marked in this score, often dismissed as sloppy copying because of their inconsistency, could possibly have been put in by Bach himself, and must be, as far as possible, bowed as written. The result is a more detailed, animated and interesting performance, with "everything as it comes, wild bowing, great fencing!" Bylsma, a pioneer in period instrument performance, manages to touch on many essential aspects of music-making in the process. One need not even agree to be inspired. Here are some of his precepts: use vibrato only as ornamentation, not to constantly force the sound. Don't .always press down with the bow - allow unimportant notes to give way to important notes. Resist the need to be always beautifuL Speak, don't sing, these works, with the rhythmic freedom of rhetoric, not the outpourings of grand opera. What he is in fact offering is a compellingly fascinating, if eccentric, manifesto for historically in- . formed performances. Bach, The Fencing Master, along with a separate facsimile copy of Bach's Six Suites for solo cello, is available directly by email from bylsma@wxs.nl. Information can be obtained from the web site www.bylsmafencing.com Anner Bylsma 's outstanding recording of the Bach Cello Suites is available from Sony Vivarte S2K 48047. Anner Bylsma is performing with Tafelmusik at Trinity-St. Paul's on March 10 to 13 at 8.00 and at 3.30 on March 14. Love To Sing? Breathe new life into your voice with a unique and sensible kinesthetic approach to vocal pedagogy. This is a method which focuses on influencing and improving the co-ordinative process of the vocal muscles. It brings them in\o equilibrium, thus eliminating muscular interference. Great for Everyone! Ji All styles JiAII Levels JiBeginners and Children welcome )i Excellent for public speakers, actors, etc. . Call Pattie Kelly for private lessons at 905-271-6896 M ARCH 1 - A PRIL 7 2004

EDUCATION FRONT Focus on summer music education While summer might seem a long way off, now is the time to start planning for summer musical activities, whether for yourself or your chill!lren. Our annual Summer Music Education supplement in the following pages provides a brief outline of some of the programs available in Ontario, and a few beyond. There are programs to suit all ages, levels and interests, from toddler-oriented to advanced professional training. In the latter category, for example, Domaine Forget (QU) offers master classes for intermediate and advanced instrumentalists, as well as chamber music, new music, and jazz singing. In addition to its regular summer programming (not listed here), the BanffCentre is hosting a Violin & Bow Repair and Restoration workshop. Also new this summer, the Silver Creek Summer Music School .offers advanced students Chamber Music, Choral Conducting and Percussion workshops at the University of Toronto's Faculty of Music. Summer Opera Lyric Theatre provides master-classes and workshops for advanced singers leading up to staged productions, and Tafelmusik's Baroque Summer Institute offers advanced and professional instrumentalists and singers the opportunity to work with some of the finest musicians in the field. For those adults and teens wishing a more relaxed approach to music making, CAMMAC provides instruction in classicai, jazz and world music to amateurs of all levels, in a new location this summer, Lakefield College. Kids and adults of all levels are invited to hone their skills at Guitar Workshop Plus cAppleby College, Oakville), and Kincardine Summer Music Festival, the Suzuki and Thornhill institutes offer a wide range of programs for all levels and ages, including in some cases children as young as three. Teachers will find worthwhile courses at the Music Gallery Institute as well as the Royal Conservatory. This summary is a random sampling from the listings we received and does not constitute an endorsement of any program over another. For further information, please visit the websites provided in the Summer Camp listings. PROGRAMS AND COURSES LISTED IN THIS SUMMER MUSIC SPECIAL ALTAMIRA OPERA CAMP 34 BANFF VIOLIN & Bow REPAIR 34 CAMMAC 34 · CENTAUR! ARTS CAMP. 34 CLASSICAL PURSUITS 34 DOMAINE FORGET 34 GUITAR WORKSHOP PLUS 34 KINCARDINE SUMMER Music 34 MOUNT ROYAL COLLEGE ORGAN ACADEMY 34 Music AT PORT MILFORD 35 Music GALLERY INSTITUTE 35 ROYAL CONSERVATORY OF Music 35 SHOWTIME Music THEATRE 54 Karen Ages S1LvER CREEK SUMMER Music 54 SOUTHERN ONT CHAMBER MUSIC INST 54 SOUTHWESTERN ONT SUZUKI INST 54 SUMMER Music FESTIVAL - SUZUKI KINGSTON 54 SUMMER OPERA LYRIC THEATRE 54 SUMMER OPERA TRAINING, YORK UNIVERSITY 54 TAFELMUSIK BAROQUE SUMMER INST 55 THORNHILL CHAMBER Music INST 55 TRYPTYCH 55 UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE VIOLIN CRAFTSMANSHIP 5 5 WESTBEN ARTS FESTIVAL 55 Sign up now at The North Toronto Institute of Music • NEW! Jazz Program • NEW! Scene Study and Acting • Private Lessons & Theory Classes • Pre-School classes Musical instruction by highly qualified teache in the heart of Toronto

Volume 26 (2020- )

Volume 26 Issue 1 - September 2020
Volume 26 Issue 2 - October 2020
Volume 26 Issue 3 - November 2020

Volumes 21-25 (2015-2020)

Volume 25 Issue 9 - July / August 2020
Volume 25 Issue 8 - May / June 2020
Volume 25 Issue 7 - April 2020
Volume 25 Issue 6 - March 2020
Volume 25 Issue 5 - February 2020
Volume 25 Issue 4 - December 2019 / January 2020
Volume 25 Issue 3 - November 2019
Volume 25 Issue 2 - October 2019
Volume 25 Issue 1 - September 2019
Volume 24 Issue 8 - May 2019
Volume 24 Issue 7 - April 2019
Volume 24 Issue 6 - March 2019
Volume 24 Issue 5 - February 2019
Volume 24 Issue 4 - December 2018 / January 2019
Volume 24 Issue 3 - November 2018
Volume 24 Issue 2 - October 2018
Volume 24 Issue 1 - September 2018
Volume 23 Issue 9 - June / July / August 2018
Volume 23 Issue 8 - May 2018
Volume 23 Issue 7 - April 2018
Volume 23 Issue 6 - March 2018
Volume 23 Issue 4 - December 2017 / January 2018
Volume 23 Issue 3 - November 2017
Volume 23 Issue 2 - October 2017
Volume 23 Issue 1 - September 2017
Volume 22 Issue 9 - Summer 2017
Volume 22 Issue 8 - May 2017
Volume 22 Issue 7 - April 2017
Volume 22 Issue 6 - March 2017
Volume 22 Issue 5 - February 2017
Volume 22 Issue 4 - December 2016/January 2017
Volume 22 Issue 2 - October 2016
Volume 22 Issue 1 - September 2016
Volume 21 Issue 9 - Summer 2016
Volume 21 Issue 8 - May 2016
Volume 21 Issue 6 - March 2016
Volume 21 Issue 5 - February 2016
Volume 21 Issue 4 - December 2015/January 2016
Volume 21 Issue 3 - November 2015
Volume 21 Issue 2 - October 2015
Volume 21 Issue 1 - September 2015

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Volumes 1-5 (1994-2000)